Elizabeth Barrette (ysabetwordsmith) wrote,
Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith

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Character notes for "Before the Nature Wants"

These are the character notes for "Before the Nature Wants."


Janna Asê -- Traditionally Kurds have not used surnames, so when asked, Janna simply gave her mother's name. She has tinted skin, brown eyes, and long straight brown hair. She is short and skinny. Her heritage is Kurdish; she speaks Arabic and Kurmanji (Northern Kurdish). She is 15 years old in October of 2014, and she was 13 when she got married. Janna had grown up in a farming village near Tall Tamir, Syria. When the fighting got bad, her family tried to escape through Iraq, but could not get out, so they followed the border south to Jordan where they finally made it across.
Janna is the wife of Hashim (41), mother of son Riad (11 months) and daughter Lina (12 days). They are Shi'ite Muslims. They were sent over directly from Jordan because aid workers worried about Janna's health after two births in one year. A search for relatives turned up Hashim's brother Faraj now living in Rutledge, Vermont so the family was sent to join him. Janna's experiences have left her with depression. Much of the time she just feels numb and exhausted. Other times she feels sad or angry, with or without reason. She leaves her husband and children because Hashim starts beating her in frustration after he fails to get a job at Green Mountain Yard & Garden.
Qualities: Good (+2) Fertility, Good (+2) Gardening, Good (+2) Naturalistic Intelligence
Poor (-2) Depression

Modern Kurdish names are mostly Arabic or Persian. The mother usually names her child. Kurds did not traditionally use surnames (last names), so most modern surnames are tribal designations or geographic locations.

Most people use Arabic naming conventions in Syria. This formatted as: [personal name] [father’s personal name] [grandfather’s personal name]. For example, Youssef Khalil Hamed (male), Fadwa Khalil Hamed (female). It is important to understand that this naming convention does not involve the use of a surname.

Matronymics are uncommon in the Middle East, so Janna's choice of last name is a small rebellion against a system she considers ridiculous.

Read about the Kurds and their religion.

Lina 'Isam -- She has fair skin, baby blue eyes, and a few wisps of brown hair. She was born on Saturday, September 27 and is 12 days old in October of 2014. Lina is cute, especially when quiet. However, she often stays quite for long periods, even if she needs something; and other times she fusses for no discernible reason. This greatly complicates her care and frustrates her mother.
Qualities: Good (+2) Cute
Poor (-2) Erratic Signaling

Riad 'Isam -- He has fair skin, hazel eyes, and light brown wavy hair. He is 11 months old. He is strong for his age, already walking. He tends to push, pull, or hit things to get what he wants and can topple surprisingly large items -- sometimes on top of himself. He is very stubborn, entering the "terrible twos" phase early.
Qualities: Good (+2) Precocious Physical Development
Poor (-2) Stubborn

Hashim 'Isam -- Traditionally Kurds have not used surnames, so when asked, Hashim simply gave his father's name. He has fair skin, hazel eyes, and short wavy brown hair with a mustache and a faint scruff of beard. He is tall and sturdy. His heritage is Kurdish; he speaks Arabic. He is 41 years old. Hashim grew up in Al-Qamishli. In 2012, he tried to escape through Turkey, but failed. So he turned south and eventually made it into Jordan.
There he decided to buy a wife, Janna. When they married, he was 39 and she was 13: exactly three times her age. They have a son Riad (11 months) and a daughter Lina (12 days). They are Shi'ite Muslims. They were sent over directly from Jordan because aid workers worried about Janna's health after two births in one year. A search for relatives turned up Hashim's brother Faraj now living in Rutledge, Vermont so the family was sent to join him. Hashim tries but fails to get a job at Green Mountain Yard & Garden. In frustration, he starts beating his wife, so Janna leaves him and the children.
Qualities: Good (+2) Farmer, Good (+2) Kinesthetic Intelligence, Good (+2) Strength, Good (+2) Survivor, Good (+2) Tough
Poor (-2) Family Man

Modern Kurdish names are mostly Arabic or Persian. The mother usually names her child. Kurds did not traditionally use surnames (last names), so most modern surnames are tribal designations or geographic locations.

Most people use Arabic naming conventions in Syria. This formatted as: [personal name] [father’s personal name] [grandfather’s personal name]. For example, Youssef Khalil Hamed (male), Fadwa Khalil Hamed (female). It is important to understand that this naming convention does not involve the use of a surname.

Child marriages are common among Syrian refugees in Jordan.

Local-America has no age limit for marriages performed outside its borders, only considering whether a marriage is legal where performed. This leads to child marriages in America, as one or both members immigrate. Some of the child brides are below the legal age of consent in their state. Terramagne-America does somewhat better in making a concerted effort to check all marriages that have a wide age difference to see whether they are willing or forced. Married children are entitled to asylum if they wish to leave their spouse, and may take their children if any with them should they want to do so; the marriage is then annulled on grounds of child molestation. However, this is greatly complicated by factors including:
* Some children marry young because they see it as a practical choice that gains them protection, financial support, or other resources. While it may not have been their first choice, they find it preferable to the alternatives and do not wish to give it up.
* Some marriages become quite close even if they started off arranged, and the spouses don't wish to separate.
* Most children are more afraid of what would happen if they left the marriage than they are of staying in it. This strongly discourages them from disclosing abuse or even dissatisfaction.
* Conversely, victims of forced marriage and/or other abuse are more likely to speak up and seek to leave the relationship.
* There are strong religious rules against divorce in many cultures, including most of those prone to child marriage.
* Nobody wants to open the can of worms involved in breaking marriages deemed legitimate by another sovereign nation. This is especially true given the cross-cultural arguments over marriage equality for same-sex and plural marriages.
* Many refugees, young spouses, and other vulnerable people are afraid of the authorities even if intended for their benefit. This applies both to spouses who like their marriage and those who do not.

See maps of Syrian agriculture, Kurdish areas, and Syrian cities.


Faraj 'Isam -- Traditionally Kurds have not used surnames, so when asked, Faraj simply gave his father's name. He has fair skin, brown eyes, and short wavy brown hair with a faint mustache and stubble of beard. His heritage is Kurdish Syrian. He speaks Arabic and Turkish, along with some English. He is 31 years old in 2014.
Faraj is the younger brother of Hashim (41), brother-in-law of Janna (15), uncle of nephew Riad (11 months) and niece Lina (12 days). Faraj grew up in Al-Qamishli and escaped through Turkey in 2011, then spent a couple years getting handed around Europe from one country to another. Eventually he made his way to America where he settled in Rutledge, Vermont. There he works at a used car lot, Carey's Auto, mostly washing and cleaning cars, sometimes helping drive them around the lot. His colors are slate gray, black, blue, and burgundy -- partly because his bosses gave him a complete set of company T-shirts in those colors when they realized he had so little to wear.
Unlike most Syrian men, Faraj disapproves of child marriage, which has caused a lot of conflict between him and his brother. It's one of several things that have largely pushed him away from Islam, leaving it more as cultural background than active faith. Hashim's family was sent over directly from Jordan because aid workers worried about Janna's health after two births in one year. A search for relatives turned up Faraj, so the family was sent to join him. Hashim tries but fails to get a job at Green Mountain Yard & Garden. In frustration, he starts beating his wife, so Janna leaves him and the children. Since Hashim is hopeless with the children, Faraj offers to watch them, and Carey encourages him to keep them.
Qualities: Good (+2) Fast, Good (+2) Interpersonal Intelligence, Good (+2) Nurturing, Good (+2) Outdoor Activities, Good (+2) Work Ethic
Poor (-2) Dysfunctional Family Dynamics


Susan Moylan -- She has fair skin, brown eyes, and long wispy brown hair. She wears glasses. Her heritage is American. She speaks English, French, and Spanish. She is 29 years old in 2014.
She grew up in a mostly functional household, but it belonged to an extended family with a lot more dysfunctional problems including child molestation, domestic violence, and substance abuse. Despite wanting a better situation in their own lives, her parents declined to cut off contact completely, which made holidays and family gatherings rather fraught. This inspired her to choose a career in social work, and also to be more selective in who she spends time with as an adult.
She earned a Bachelor of Science in Social Work with a Certificate in Trauma-Informed Care at the Silver School of Social Work (NYU) and a minor in Peace and Conflict Studies at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development (NYU) in New York, Eastbord, New York. Later she got an Intermediate Certificate in Sexual Violence Support from the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence. Currently she lives in Rutledge, Vermont where she serves as a social worker at the Parent Child Center. Her cheerful and trustworthy nature make her popular there.
Qualties: Good (+2) Cheerful, Good (+2) Emotional Intelligence, Good (+2) Social Worker, Good (+2) Stamina, Good (+2) Trustworthy
Poor (-2) Family Baggage

Bachelor of Science in Social Work
at the Silver School of Social Work in New York, Eastbord, New York

The NYU Silver School of Social Work’s curriculum is grounded in the liberal arts tradition of empowering students and preparing them to manage complexity, diversity, and change. NYU Silver is committed to a person-in-environment approach with a liberal arts foundation, which broadens and deepens the student’s perspective and is an important basis for understanding human nature and society.
All social work majors complete 64 credits in their major as well as an additional 64 in their Liberal Arts Core classes.
Liberal Arts (64 credits)
Social work education at NYU Silver encompasses a core set of classes that enhance the student’s experience and growth as a generalist practice social work professional. The program’s liberal arts foundation broadens the student’s perspective and is fundamental to the basic understanding of social work. Students can take classes at the College of Arts and Science, NYU Steinhardt, and other approved schools to satisfy the University's liberal arts requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. Liberal arts courses provide an essential foundation for the social work major, including 20 credit hours that make up the core classes: two writing courses, sociology, psychology, and biology, along with an additional 44 credit hour classes in humanities, social sciences, and electives. The majority of these are taken prior to junior and senior year.
Core Classes
COURSE TITLE CREDITS
Writing in Community 8
Introduction to Sociology 4
Introduction to Psychology 4
Human Biology 4

Humanities
COURSE TITLE CREDITS
Varied selection of humanities courses 12
Students may select these courses from offerings by the English, Drama, History, Language, Religion, and Philosophy Departments
HIST-UA 471 RACE AND FAMILY STORIES
LING-UA 3 Language and Mind
RELST-UA 428 Creating a Good Society: Greek, Christian, and Jewish Perspectives
PHIL-UA 3 Ethics and Society

HIST-UA 471 RACE AND FAMILY STORIES
Martha Hodes Tues. 2:00-4:45pm
(Also fulfills US major requirement)
This capstone seminar concerns the ways in which racial classification and identification take root, and change, within families. We will take as our starting-point the fact that ideas about race and categories of race are not timeless or unchanging; rather, they have a history, and continue to change across time, regions, nations, and cultures. Yet to understand the mythical aspects of race is not to deny their profound and powerful effects upon the daily lives of historical actors. During the semester, students will complete a research paper on the topic of race and family, with attention to rigorous historical research and the craft of history-writing.

LING-UA 3 Language and Mind
Formerly LING-UA 28. Identical to PSYCH-UA 27. Offered every year. Adriaans, Baltin, Davidson, Marantz, Marcus, McElree, Murphy, Pylkkanen, Szabolcsi. 4 points.
Introduces the field of cognitive science through an examination of language behavior. Begins with interactive discussions of how best to characterize and study the mind. These principles are then illustrated through an examination of research and theories related to language representation and use. Draws from research in both formal linguistics and psycholinguistics.

RELST-UA 428 Creating a Good Society: Greek, Christian, and Jewish Perspectives
Identical to HBRJD-UA 428 and PHIL-UA 428. Offered every one or two years. Gottlieb. 4 points. Recommended prerequisite: Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives (HBRJD-UA 422)
Central questions: What is the best form of government? What economic system is ideal? Should government actively promote a vision of the good life or leave it to individuals to decide the good for themselves? Should government prioritize the freedom, equality, or happiness of its inhabitants? What role should religion and nationhood play in society? What models of education should government promote? Careful analysis of primary texts by Plato, Maimonides, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Mendelssohn, Marx, and Hess.

PHIL-UA 3 Ethics and Society
Formerly PHIL-UA 5. Offered every year. 4 points.
An introduction to philosophy through the study of selected moral and social issues. Topics may include inequalities and justice; public vs. private good; regulation of sexual conduct and abortion; war and capital punishment.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
COURSE TITLE CREDITS
Varied selection of social and behavioral sciences 16
Students select from courses ranging from Anthropology, Economics, Metropolitan Studies, Politics, Psychology, Sociology, Gender Studies, Africana Studies Departments, and many other offerings around campus.
ANTH-UA 41 Family and Kinship
SCA-UA 101.001 Social & Cultural Analysis 101
SOC-UA 452 IMMIGRATION
SCA-UA 280.001 Topics: Human Trafficking

ANTH-UA 41 Family and Kinship
Khan, Myers, Rapp. 4 points.
Explores cross-cultural diversity in the organization of family life and kin relationships. Discusses how anthropology's cross-cultural perspective helps illuminate new or controversial family arrangements in Western societies.

SCA-UA 101.001 Social & Cultural Analysis 101
Recitation required

SOC-UA 452 IMMIGRATION
NO RECITATION SECTION REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE.
This course provides an introduction to contemporary immigration to the United States, against the backdrop of immigration since the start of the Republic and rooted in socio-behavioral science. The first half of the course is devoted to understanding U.S. law and policy governing immigration, and the second to understanding the characteristics and behavior of foreign-born - especially immigrants - in the United States.
Undergraduate 4 Points

SCA-UA 280.001 Topics: Human Trafficking
Barrett; TR 9:30-10:45 (4 points)

Unrestricted Electives
COURSE TITLE CREDITS
Unrestricted electives taken in humanities, social and behavioral sciences, computer science, creative arts, mathematics, and science offered through the College of Arts and Sciences, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, Stern School of Business, Tisch School of the Arts, or other schools within NYU
SCA-UA 608.001: Urban Cultural Life 16

SCA-UA 608.001 or 608.060 (pre-college): Urban Cultural Life
Prof. Jackson Smith Tue, Thu 3:00 – 6:00 PM
Few cities enjoy as rich a cultural life as New York City, with its plethora of neighborhoods, museums, galleries, theatres, concert halls, and alternative spaces. Through walking tours, attendance at cultural events, and visits to local cultural institutions, students explore the definition of urban culture. Sites include the familiar and the unfamiliar, the Village and the outer boroughs. Students examine the attributes that constitute culture and community from an interdisciplinary perspective. SCA Faculty Elective for Africana, American, Metropolitan, and SCA.

Social Work Major Credits (64)
Courses in the social work major core are designed to prepare students to be general practice social workers by giving them an interdisciplinary education, a deeper understanding of human relationships, and the tools to work in any system, while maintaining the core ethical values of the field.
Courses in social work practice are closely integrated with supervised social agency experience so that the student has the opportunity to apply in practice the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Students can start their field internship as early as their Junior year.
Social Work Required Courses
COURSE TITLE CREDITS
Society and Social Welfare 4
First Year Impact Seminar I 0
First Year Impact Seminar II 0
Skills in Interpersonal Communications 4
Human Behavior in the Social Environment I 4
Human Behavior in the Social Environment II 4
Diversity Racism Oppression & Privilege 4
Social Work Research 4
Agencies and Organizations 4
Social Welfare Programs & Policies 4
Practice I 4
Practice II 4
Field Experience Lab 5
Field Instruction I (Internship) 6
Field Instruction II (Internship) 6
Social Work Elective
Clinical Practice with Children and Their Families 4
Social Work Elective
Community Organization 4
https://socialwork.nyu.edu/a-silver-education/degree-programs/bs/curriculum.html


Certificate in Trauma-Informed Care (T-American)
at the Silver School of Social Work in New York, Eastbord, New York
• Current Approaches to Trauma
• Core Concepts in Child and Adolescent Trauma
• Evidence-Based Practice
• Sexual and Gender Minorities: Past, Present, Future
• Grief, Loss, and Bereavement
• Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees


(T-America requires one class per theme in electives, making the minor 24 credits.)
Peace and Conflict Studies Minor Requirements
at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development (NYU)
Required core courses and restricted electives are offered once per year through the Department of Applied Statistics, Social Science, and Humanities. There is no required sequence of courses.
For help planning your schedule or questions about the minor requirements, please contact the PACS adviser.
A. Required Core Course (4 Credits)
INTE-UE 1013 Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies
B. Restricted Electives (4 Credits)
Choose at least one of the two following options:
INTE-UE 1010 International Human Rights Activism and Education (4 credits)
C. Unrestricted Electives (8 Credits)
Choose additional courses to total 8 credits from a wealth of options across the university, both on Washington Square and at NYU’s global sites. Courses are grouped into themes; students may take courses from one theme or many.
You may select from the lists below, or visit our Global Options page to see how you can include study abroad experiences in your coursework.
If you would like to take courses related to peace and conflict studies that do not appear on this list, you may request credit toward the minor with approval of the PACS Adviser.
Analyzing and Explaining Conflict and Violence
GT-UF 201 Global Violence: Vulnerable and Targeted Peoples (4 credits)

Peace, Justice, and Development
UNDSW-US 67 Social Justice and Peacemaking (4 credits)

Human Rights and Advocacy
UPADM-GP 269 How to Change the World: Advocacy Movements and Social Innovation (4 credits)

International and Area Studies
MCC-UE 1341 Middle East Media (formerly Islam, Media and the West) (4 credits)


Intermediate Certificate in Sexual Violence Support (T-American)
from the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence
In Terramagne-America, the NCDSV offers a basic certificate for people who complete 10 courses or trainings, intermediate for 15, and advanced for 20.

Advocacy for Victims of Abuse
Online Tutorial on Abuse – a self-paced tutorial on abuse for clergy, spiritual leaders and teachers. The purpose is to provide leaders with the needed information on issues of domestic violence and childhood sexual assault. Given the prevalence of abuse, all faith leaders need basic knowledge about these two types of violence.

A CALL TO MEN
Coaching Healthy & Respectful Manhood ~ Online Training Certification – was developed for educators and mentors to educate boys. We encourage both male and female teachers to get certified and implement the lessons in their schools. The curriculum is free.

AEquitas
Battered Women Charged with Crimes – this previously- recorded webinar was developed to help prosecutors and criminal justice partners identify, evaluate, and develop improved responses to cases involving battered women who are arrested for using violence against their abusers.

Against Violence & Abuse
Complicated matters: domestic and sexual violence, problematic substance use and mental ill-health – domestic and violence, problematic substance use and mental ill-health are three issues which often co-exist. And when they do, things can become complicated. This course is designed to 'uncomplicate' matters by raising your awareness about how the three issues interlink and reflecting on the most effective ways to engage with individuals and families who are affected by these issues.

America's Heroes at Work
TBI, PTSD & Employment – an online training tool for employers, supervisors & hiring managers.

American Nurses Association
Human Trafficking: Recognition & Intervention – this course introduces nurses to the emergent nursing care of human trafficking victims. An overview about the types of human trafficking, methods of coercion, recruitment strategies, and recognition of human trafficking victims is provided. Nurses will explore screening tools, available resources, and nursing interventions that facilitate interdisciplinary, victim-centered, care.

ASISTA, Center for Gender & Refugee Studies and Tahirh Justice Center
Helping Those Released from Family Detention: Asylum Options for Immigrant Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence – this webinar series is for attorneys, accredited representatives, domestic and sexual violence advocates, mental health service providers and social workers already familiar with VAWA and U visas to help women and children released from family detention centers. Specifically, it is designed to expand your knowledge and capacity to help survivors fleeing domestic and sexual violence in their home countries apply for asylum. Copyright © 2016 ASISTA, Center for Gender and Refugee Studies and Tahirih Justice Center.

Battered Women's Justice Project
Safety at Home: Intimate Partner Violence, Military Personnel and Veterans – the course is designed for advocates (military and civilian) who provide services to military-related families experiencing intimate partner violence. The course will also be helpful for social service and mental health practitioners who are working with these victims and their families. The self-paced course includes eight modules with mini-lectures, case studies, video clips, practice scenarios, and opportunities for self-assessment to test mastery of course content. Supplemental materials are available to download.

The Center for Prevention of Child Abuse Maltreatment
Early Detection Training Program – teaches medical professionals how to identify and report potential signs of child treatment.

Darkness to Light
Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Training ONLINE – this prevention training program teaches adults how to prevent, recognize and react responsibly to child sexual abuse. The program is designed for individuals concerned about the safety of children as well as organizations that serve youth. The online version allows individuals to take the training at any time or place, at a pace of their choosing.

Headington Institute
Understanding and Addressing Vicarious Trauma– this module is an introduction to the topic of vicarious trauma and humanitarian work. It provides an overview so that you can learn about this at your own pace. It also includes links and references to other resources on this topic.

Honor our Voices
Honor our Voices ~ Children's Perspectives of Domestic Violence – a unique online learning module providing you with the opportunity to see domestic violence through the eyes and voices of children. The purpose of this learning module is to create a multi-pronged response to increase the awareness and sensitivity of shelter advocates and other social service providers to the needs of children and suggest promising ways of enhancing services for children exposed to domestic violence.

National Sexual Violence Resource Center
Evaluating Sexual Violence Prevention Programs: Steps and Strategies for Preventionists – walks the user through the basics of evaluating the impact of sexual violence prevention programs, 2012.
From Approach to Practice: Improving outcomes for children after sexual abuse – in this course, victim service professionals will review trauma-informed practices for working with children surviving sexual abuse, learn role-specific recommendations for working with these children, and identify new ideas for collaborating with other professionals, 2014.
Maturing Your Services: Advocating for Survivors of Sexual Violence in Later Life – this interactive online course is designed to increase advocates' and other victim service professionals' capacity for serving victims of sexual violence in later life. Considerations for serving older victims are explored in three sections ~ social, physical and emotional factors ~ with opportunities to practice and reflect upon the information, 2013.

UNICEF
Child Rights and Why They Matter – this short course will transform and/or refresh your understanding of child rights and a child rights approach, introduce you to UNICEF’s mandate as it relates to child rights, and inspire you to apply a child rights lens to your everyday work and life.

Front view of Susan Moylan

Back view
Tags: community, cyberfunded creativity, ethnic studies, family skills, fantasy, fishbowl, gender studies, poetry, reading, safety, weblit, writing
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