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Character notes for "Everywhere Immigrants Have Enriched"

These are the character notes for "Everywhere Immigrants Have Enriched."


Noemie l'Amour -- She has fair skin, blue eyes, and long wavy hair of strawberry blonde. She is biromantic bisexual. Her heritage is French-American. She speaks Arabic, English, Esperanto, French, German, Hebrew (modern and classical), Italian, and Spanish. She is 28 years old in 2014. Noemie earned a Bachelor of Arts in Middle East and North Africa Studies with a Hebrew Minor at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont. After graduating at 21, she worked for a year at a nonprofit assisting Israeli and Palestinian refugees. From there Noemie switched to SPOON, helping them with refugee soups. Although she liked the soups, she disliked her supervisor, and soon quit. Normally easygoing, she has no patience with politicking or other bullshit. At 24, Noemie went on to get a Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation with a Linguistics Minor from the same school. Upon graduation, she got a job with a company that offered interpretation and translation services, but it closed in 2013 and she could not find another job in her field until Rutledge needed Arabic speakers to support the Syrian refugees. The government contract only runs for a year, but she fervently hopes to find another in Rutledge after that.
Qualities: Good (+2) Cosmopolitan, Good (+2) Graceful, Good (+2) Helpful, Good (+2) Interpreter-Translator, Good (+2) Linguistic Intelligence
Poor (-2) Bullshit Tolerance

Bachelor of Arts in Middle East and North Africa Studies
at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont
Middle East Studies Director: Ian Barrow (History)
Phone 802-443-2554
Email: ibarrow@middlebury.edu
The Middle East Studies major highlights the social, historical, political, cultural, and linguistic traditions of this varied region and illuminates the area’s centrality and relevance in today’s world. Transcending the simplistic paradigms which often saturate current news outlets, the major emphasizes and encourages a complex and multi-disciplinary approach towards the study of the region. The major also draws upon and showcases the expertise of our diverse faculty from multiple departments and programs, whose research, publications, and teaching encapsulate the region’s geographic expanse.
As a Middle East Studies major, you will be exposed to a rich array of disciplinary and intellectual perspectives. Our curriculum stresses the region’s foundational religious traditions; the historical rise of major Islamic empires; the promises and disruptions of modern colonialism and nationalism; current political conflicts and wars; disputes and negotiations over borders and natural resources; the rise of diasporic and refugee communities; and the region’s cultural richness in poetry, literature, linguistics, religious practices, and even food.
Finally, MES majors develop advanced proficiency in either Arabic or Hebrew through coursework at Middlebury College and at one of the Middlebury C.V. Starr Schools Abroad in the Middle East.
Requirements
Introduction to International and Global Studies. Students must take IGST 101 before studying abroad. IGST 0101 is not open to seniors except for those who declared the major as sophomores and spent the fall semester of their junior year abroad. Students who declare their major as a sophomore but have not taken IGST 0101, and plan to study abroad for only one semester must take it in the fall of their junior year prior to going abroad.
Regional specialization. Five courses on the Middle East and/or North Africa in at least three departments (at least one of which should be in Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science or Sociology). At least three regional courses must be taken at Middlebury. See available courses here.
• ARBC 0414 Readings in Modern Arabic Literature
• HARC 0256 A Photography of the Middle East
• RELI 0150 The Islamic Traditions
• ARBC/LNGT 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics
• PSCI 0217 Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
Global Courses. Three global courses from the Global list; only one can be at the 0100 level. These global courses are thematic, trans-regional, emphasize connectivity of places and the circulation of ideas and phenomena. Except for students who study abroad an entire year, these courses must be taken on the Middlebury College campus.
• AMST 0307 - Disability Issues/U.S. & World*
• HIST 0117 - Diasporas in History
• PSCI 0240 - Comp Pol of Ethnic Diversity
• SPAN 0329 - Superhero Parodies

Language Study. Successful completion of three years of Arabic or Modern Hebrew or its equivalent. Students who choose Modern Hebrew must be willing to pursue language study beyond Middlebury, if the College’s Hebrew program is unable to offer a full range of advanced courses.
• ARBC 0101 - Beginning Arabic I
• ARBC 0102 - Beginning Arabic II
• ARBC 0103 - Beginning Arabic III
• ARBC 0201 - Intermediate Arabic I
• ARBC 0202 - Intermediate Arabic II
• ARBC 0301 - Advanced Arabic I
• ARBC 0302 - Advanced Arabic II
• ARBC 0401 - Advanced Arabic III
• ARBC 0402 - Advanced Arabic IV

Study Abroad. Students must study at least one semester at one of the Middlebury C.V. Starr Schools Abroad in the Middle East:
The School in Morocco (Mohammed V University, Rabat) - Arabic
Students who study abroad in Israel must have successfully completed a minimum of three semesters of Hebrew at Middlebury and are required to take the Ulpan in Israel.
Students who study abroad for one semester may count up to two courses toward the major and those who study abroad for a full year may count up to four. Major credit will be granted, pending approval, upon the student’s return from abroad. For regional courses, approval is granted by the track director and for global courses by the IGS director. Students should share the syllabi and all written work for all courses they wish to count with the track or program director, respectively.

Senior Program. The senior program consists of: (1) a senior IGST seminar at 400-level or with permission of IGS director, a thematic senior seminar in a department and (2) an upper-level course, preferably two, in Arabic or Hebrew after returning from abroad. The language departments determine which courses fulfill this requirement, in consultation with the program director.
• IGST 0436 - Terrorism
• ARBC 0414 - Reading Mod Arab Lit
• HEBM 0264 - Modern Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (T-American)

She wrote her honors thesis on the language politics of the Middle East.
Honors. Students who seek to graduate with Honors may elect to write a two-term senior honors thesis. Students are eligible to write an honors thesis if they have a 3.5 GPA or better in all courses that count for the major. These include all language courses, all regional courses, all global courses, all courses taken abroad, and all courses with an IGST designation. Thesis grades do not count in the calculation of the GPA for honors. Thesis guidelines and procedures can be found at go/igsthesis.

Middle East & North Africa Studies Regional Courses 2020-2021 AY
Fall 2020
• ARBC 0414 Readings in Modern Arabic Literature
• HARC 0256 A Photography of the Middle East
• RELI 0150 The Islamic Traditions
Winter 2021 TBD
Spring 2021
• ARBC/LNGT 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics
• PSCI 0217 Politics of the Middle East and North Africa

List of Global Courses
Students must take three global courses, only one of which may be at the 100 level.
Courses offered in the upcoming year are indicated by an *.
AMST 0307 - Disability Issues/U.S. & World*
HIST 0117 - Diasporas in History
PSCI 0240 - Comp Pol of Ethnic Diversity
SPAN 0329 - Superhero Parodies

AMST 0307 - Disability Issues/U.S. & World*
Issues in Critical Disability Studies: U.S. and the World
Disability as a category and as lived experience plays an important but often overlooked role in national, transnational, and global contexts. In this course we will explore disability’s changing meanings in the United States and around the World. Comparative and transnational approaches will draw our attention to disability’s many meanings across wide-ranging historical, cultural, and geographical settings. Foundational concepts and principles, including ableism and Universal Design, shape our critical inquiry. Key themes frame the course: access, language, power, violence, normalcy, identity, community, institutions, and rights and justice. We will engage with diverse primary sources, from memoirs and documentary films to advertisements, material objects, and oral histories. CMP HIS NOR SOC
Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2020

HIST 0117 - Diasporas in History
Diasporas in History
Disruptions, disasters, and dreams have led to migrations and diasporas for millennia. In this course we explore the global flow of people across political boundaries throughout history. We will use specific case studies from (but not limited to) the African, Jewish, Latin American, and Asian diasporas to challenge the idea of the unified nation-state, meanings of race and assimilation, and ideas of belonging to more than one place. We will analyze how nationalists divide “natives” and “migrants” and utilize Adichie’s idea of “the danger of the single story” to study intersectional alliances within and across diaspora groups. Students will choose a research topic on a diaspora community of their interest and be required to make direct contact with the communities we study. 3 hrs. sem. CMP HIS SOC Fall 2018

PSCI 0240 - Comp Pol of Ethnic Diversity
Race Around the World: The Comparative Politics of Ethnic Diversity
This course aims to promote reflection on the interactions between the state and ethnic and racially diverse societies. We will examine the political development of concepts of race and racism and address topics such as slave emancipation, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, and decolonization, as well as contemporary issues such as affirmative action, hate crimes, and Islamophobia. We will draw on readings and case studies from North America, South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) CMP CW SOC
Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

SPAN 0329 - Superhero Parodies
In this class we will discuss how the superhero/adventure genre in comic books was initially constructed as a mouthpiece of traditionalist nationalist values in the United States and Spain. Through the study of theories of intertextuality and postcolonial theory, students will analyze how Hispanic/Latin comic book creators from Europe and the Americas have parodied the hegemonic values that have influenced our views of economics, gender, and race with the goals of bringing diversity and inclusion in this particular graphic narrative genre. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL AMR ART CMP LIT LNG Fall 2017


Hebrew Minor Requirements
at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont
Middlebury offers a minor in Modern Hebrew. Courses taken in the summer at the Middlebury School of Hebrew will be granted credit toward the minor. Courses taken elsewhere may be granted credit with the permission of the director of the Program in Modern Hebrew. Students should plan the minor knowing that beginning Modern Hebrew is only offered in the fall term.
Requirements for Minor in Modern Hebrew (HEBM)
(I) Three semesters of Modern Hebrew starting at the level of HEBM 0103 or higher; plus
HEBM 0101 - Introduction Modern Hebrew I
HEBM 0102 - Intro Modern Hebrew II
HEBM 0103 - Intro Modern Hebrew III
HEBM 0201 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew I
HEBM 0202 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
HEBM 0301 - Advanced Intermediate Hebrew
HEBM 0302 - Advanced Hebrew
HEBM 0412 - Continuing Advanced Hebrew
(II) Two content courses with HEBM designation at the 0200 level or higher. One or both of these courses may be on Hebrew culture or literature in translation (taught in English), and/or one may be taken abroad in Hebrew and must be approved by the Director of the Program in Modern Hebrew. When appropriate, students may substitute independent study (HEBM 0500) for one of the courses required for the minor.
HEBM 0258 - Israeli Society Through Film
HEBM 0411 - Translating Hebrew
Students interested in studying Classical Hebrew should contact Professor Robert Schine.
HEBR 0500 - Independent Study


Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation
at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont
The Middlebury Institute Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation, Master of Arts in Conference Interpretation, and Master of Arts in Translation are four-semester, 60-credit programs.
• Translation and Interpretation
• Conference Interpretation
• Translation
• Available for all three degrees: specializations and internships

Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation

August 60 Optional Required
Translation and Interpretation Sample Course Schedule
Fall Start, Full Time, Four Semesters

Fall 1 Introduction to Translation (B–A, A–B) 8
Fall 1 Introduction to Interpretation (B–A, A–B) 4
Fall 1 Translation Technology 2
Fall 1 Electives 2
Spring 1 Intermediate Translation (B–A, A–B) 8
Spring 1 Intermediate Interpretation—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Spring 1 Intermediate Interpretation—Simultaneous (B–A) 2
Spring 1 Advanced Translation Technology 2
Fall 2 Advanced Translation I (A–B, B–A) 4
Fall 2 Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Fall 2 Advanced Interpretation I—Simultaneous (B–A) 2
Fall 2 Electives 4
Spring 2 Advanced Translation II (A–B, B–A) 4
Spring 2 Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Spring 2 Advanced Interpretation II—Simultaneous (B–A) 2
Spring 2 Translation and Interpretation as a Profession 2
Spring 2 Electives 2
Core Course Work
Translation
Learn to provide high-quality translation and independently edit and revise pieces using the latest in translation technologies. You will be introduced to a variety of genres and fields, including politics, economics, science, and technology.
Interpretation
Learn to interpret in both consecutive and simultaneous modes across a variety of genres and fields. You will also learn to work in interpretation booths and gain experience with various technologies used for interpretation in today’s markets.
Tools and Technology
The translation market is constantly adapting to new technologies. Gain experience and familiarity with these technologies and consider the ways in which they will facilitate and affect your professional practice.
Theory
Explore the latest theories in translation research so you are familiar with the current work being done in the field, and consider the impact this has on your own translation work.
Professional Skills
Gain real-world experience by participating in the student-run Fall Forum. You will use your interpretation skills with a live audience. You’ll also participate in Translation and Interpretation as a Profession, a career-focused course that helps prepare you for the markets in which you may work. In conjunction with this course, your career and academic advisor will provide information and guidance regarding your career goals.
Electives (18–21 credits)
You will complete your degree with electives of your choice. You can take literary translation, translation technology courses, pursue further interpretation course work, build your confidence in public speaking, or take general courses from other programs to build on your expertise.
Recommended electives:
• Translation Technology (2 credits)
• Advanced Translation Technology (2 credits)
• Intermediate Interpretation Simultaneous B-A (2 credits)
• Advanced Interpretation Simultaneous B-A (2 credits)
• Advanced Interpretation II Simultaneous B-A (2 credits)


Linguistics Minor
at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont
Requirements
The linguistics minor consists of a minimum of five courses: two required introductory level courses and three electives.
Required courses for the minor are as follows:
LNGT 0101 Introduction to Linguistics
LNGT 0102 Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Electives include the following:
LNGT/ARBC 0225 Arabic Linguistics
LNGT/ARBC 0421 Arabic Linguistic Variation (taught in Arabic)
LNGT/ARBC 0435 Arabic Diglossia (taught in Arabic)
LNGT 1001 Introduction to Translation Studies
LNGT/EDST 1003 Introduction to TESOL


Lenore Richards -- She has pinkish-fair skin, dark hazel eyes, and short wavy blonde hair. She wears glasses. Her heritage is French-American; she speaks English and French. She is 48 years old in 2014.
Lenore earned a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Nature Studies minor at Lyndon State College in Lyndonville, Vermont. She joined the Lyndon Outing Club for dog sledding, mountain biking, skiing, snowboarding, and other wilderness sports. After graduating, she worked in several jobs around the state, often a combination of office and nature hours.
Currently Lenore runs the office at Green Mountain Yard & Garden in Rutledge, Vermont. She excels at math and business decisions, but sucks at gardening and customer relations which she leaves to her husband Elry. They have four children. The older son (Edwin, 26) and daughter (Lena, 23) went away to college and never came back. Lenore and Elry are desperate to find anything that could keep the younger daughter (Rosamond, 18) and son (Willie, 16) at home. As a hobby, Lenore enjoys walking through nature, taking pictures, and writing about it.
Qualities: Good (+2) Logical-Mathematical Intelligence, Good (+2) Office Manager, Good (+2) Nature Lover, Good (+2) Networking, Good (+2) Stamina

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
at Lyndon State College in Lyndonville, Vermont
Requirements for the program

Business Administration Core: (56 Credits)

• BUS 1010 - Introduction to Business Credits: 3
• BUS 1090 - Business Math Credits: 3
• BUS 1210 - Introduction to Business Software Credits: 3
• BUS 3131 - Business Law I Credits: 3
• ACC 2121 - Financial Accounting Credits: 4
• ACC 2122 - Managerial Accounting Credits: 4
• ECO 2020 - Macroeconomics Credits: 3
• ECO 2030 - Microeconomics Credits: 3
• BUS 2420 - Effective Management Presentations Credits: 3
• BUS 2020 - Principles of Management Credits: 3
• BUS 2230 - Principles of Marketing Credits: 3
• MAT 2021 - Statistics Credits: 3
• BUS 3150 - Production/Operations Management Credits: 3
• BUS 3230 - Financial Management Credits: 3
• BUS 3240 - International Business Credits: 3
• BUS 3250 - Organizational Behavior in Business Credits: 3
• BUS 3810 - Business Internship Credits: 3
or BUS 4830 Senior Practicum
• BUS 4060 - Strategic Management Credits: 3

Business Concentration: (9 credits)
Advised Term - Third and Fourth Year
Choose three courses (nine credits) from the Business Concentration list at the end of this section.
Marketing Concentration
Choose 3 courses from (9 credits):
• BUS 2235 - Service Marketing Credits: 3
• BUS 3030 - Customer Satisfaction and Retention Credits: 3
• BUS 3160 - Sales Management and Selling Credits: 3
• BUS 3210 - Advertising Management Credits: 3
• BUS 4030 - Marketing Research Credits: 3
Finance Concentration
Choose 3 courses from (9 credits):
• BUS 2060 - Money and Capital Markets Credits: 3
• BUS 2140 - Personal Finance Credits: 3
• BUS 3260 - Investment and Portfolio Management Credits: 3
• BUS 4160 - Financial Analysis Credits: 3
Management Concentration
Choose 3 courses from (9 credits):
• BUS 2250 - Business Ethics Credits: 3
• BUS 2410 - Human Resources Management Credits: 3
• BUS 3350 - Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

Courses for Business Concentration
Each of the following courses partially fulfills requirements for the business concentration unless it is part of the core for a specific degree program. Courses in the core for B.S. degrees and not in the core for A.S. degrees also may be used for A.S. concentration courses if they have an alphanumeric designator of ACC/BUS/ECO 2000 or higher. (Other business courses may be included as approved by the department.)
• ACC 2230 - Federal Taxes Credits: 3
• ACC 3025 - Cost Management Credits: 3
• ACC 3111 - Advanced Intermediate Accounting I Credits: 4
• ACC 3112 - Advanced Intermediate Accounting II Credits: 4
• ACC 4050 - Auditing and Assurance Services Credits: 3
• BUS 2025 - Nonprofit Management Credits: 3
• BUS 2045 - Information Technology Credits: 3
• BUS 2060 - Money and Capital Markets Credits: 3
• BUS 2140 - Personal Finance Credits: 3
• BUS 2235 - Service Marketing Credits: 3
• BUS 2250 - Business Ethics Credits: 3
• BUS 2265 - Fiscal Management Credits: 3
• BUS 2410 - Human Resources Management Credits: 3
• BUS 3030 - Customer Satisfaction and Retention Credits: 3
• BUS 3132 - Business Law II Credits: 3
• BUS 3160 - Sales Management and Selling Credits: 3
• BUS 3210 - Advertising Management Credits: 3
• BUS 3240 - International Business Credits: 3
• BUS 3260 - Investment and Portfolio Management Credits: 3
• BUS 3350 - Entrepreneurship Credits: 3
• BUS 3810 - Business Internship Credits: 3
• BUS 4030 - Marketing Research Credits: 3
• BUS 4160 - Financial Analysis Credits: 3


Minor in Nature Studies (T-American)
at Lyndon State College in Lyndonville, Vermont
Courses taken for the minor should add up to 20 credits.

Core Courses (Credits: 6)
All students take these classes.
• MRM 1010 - Leisure and Society Credits: 3
• MRM 2130 - Wilderness Mind Credits: 3

Practical Courses (Credits: 3-6)
Students choose 3-6 credits in practical activities.
• MRM 1120 - Outdoor Adventure Skills Credits: 1
• MRM 1132 - Outdoor Adventure Skills Credits: 1-2
• MRM 1810 - Outdoor Education/Recreation Practicum Credits: 3

MRM 1010 - Leisure and Society Credits: 3
[LGGE6] [Choice:SS] Leisure and Society presents an overview of global historical and philosophical foundations of leisure and recreation, including public and private leisure service delivery systems. It provides a conceptual basis for the evolution of leisure and work in relation to social, economic, and environmental factors in the context of mountain and community-based recreation, tourism, and hospitality. Career paths in leisure-related services are examined, along with trends and issues facing the profession.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. The course is offered every spring.

MRM 1120 - Outdoor Adventure Skills Credits: 1
This course practices specific outdoor adventure skills, including such seasonal activities as flatwater canoeing, beginning rock climbing, orienteering, and snowshoeing.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. This course is offered every fall and may be repeated for credit.

MRM 1132 - Outdoor Adventure Skills Credits: 1 to 2
This course practices more advanced outdoor adventure skills, including such seasonal activities as whitewater canoeing, intermediate rock climbing, winter mountaineering, ice climbing, ropes course, and top rope climbing site management.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. This course is offered every semester.

MRM 1810 - Outdoor Education/Recreation Practicum Credits: 3
This course acquaints students with various types of environmental settings. The instruction offers classroom learning in the spring semester and outdoor learning in local mountains and rivers one week following the spring semester or prior to the fall semester. The instruction offers competency for those students who may later serve as student leaders for the practicum. Register for second-half mini course.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. This course is offered every spring.

MRM 2130 - Wilderness Mind Credits: 3
[LGNR7] [Choice:OC] This course explores the interface between wilderness and the self from historical, cultural, psychological, and personal perspectives, aimed toward the student’s development of her or his own wilderness ethic. The course examines historical American perspectives on wilderness and assesses how our relationship with wilderness has changed over time. These perspectives are then compared and contrasted with views presented by other cultures. These explorations will be advanced through the use of lecture, dialogue, and experiential learning. Throughout the course, the student will be challenged to examine her or his own views on the meaning, purpose, and value of wilderness and to develop a set of personal ethics and practices that correspond with those views. This course includes a two day Leave No Trace trainer course leading to certification with the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. This course is offered every fall semester.

MRM 2060 - Wilderness First Responder Procedures
This course integrates wilderness and medical training that leads to certification in Wilderness First Responder (WFR). The course content meets the Department of Transportation National Standards for First Responder with additional protocols for extended care situations.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. This course is offered every fall.
Credits: 3

MRM 3140 - Outdoor Expedition Credits: 1 to 4
This course presents an opportunity for individuals to help plan and participate in extended wilderness trips and expeditions, or any activity-oriented program in ski resort or outdoor recreation settings.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. This course is offered every semester and may be repeated for credit.

Lab (Credits 2-4)
Students choose one lab course.
BIO 1110 - Bird Identification Credits: 2

BIO 1110 - Bird Identification Credits: 2
This course is designed for students interested in being able to identify the local birds in field and in laboratory. A final field test and bird list is required.
Prerequisites & Notes
There is a lab fee. This course is offered by student request.

Creativity (Credits 1-4)
Students choose one creative course.
ART 2301 - Photography I Credits: 3
ENG 2070 Nature Writers and Nature Writing Credits: 2 (T-American)

ART 2301 - Photography I Credits: 3
[Choice:AR] This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the art, science and craft of photography. The instruction covers such subjects as camera controls and operation, film exposure and development, black-and-white darkroom printing, print finishing and presentation aesthetics, and history.
Prerequisites & Notes
A fully functional and adjustable 35mm SLR camera with 50mm lens is required. There is a lab fee.

ART 2810 Vermont En Plain Air Credits: 1 to 4 (T-American)
This class has four sessions per week, and students can sign up for as many as they want. There are thematic sessions for oil or acrylic painting, watercolors, and charcoal or colored pencil. These sessions focus primarily on materials and techniques. The fourth session is open to all creative media, primarily visual art but sometimes a student will do music or writing instead. This one concentrates on choosing natural venues and subjects. The weekly sessions go outside on campus or around town. Each weekend offers a longer field trip somewhere in Vermont. Students who attend enough of the weekend trips can earn honors credit. Art majors must take the class for a letter grade based on quality. Other students may choose between that and a Pass/Fail grade based on attendance and effort.

ENG 2070 Nature Writers and Nature Writing Credits: 2 (T-American)
This class meets twice a week. The first session features a famous nature writer from the northeast. The second session involves a field trip for students to practice their own writing in the wild.

Outdoor Activities (Credits 1-6)
Students choose an outdoor sport or club.
Clubs
Lyndon Outing Club


Ghazwan Awad -- He has light brown skin, dark brown eyes, and short curly black hair with a mustache and beard. He is sturdy and muscular. He is heterosexual. His faith is Sunni Muslim. His heritage is Syrian; he speaks Arabic. He is 33 years old in 2014.
Ghazwan grew up in Ar Raqqah, Syria. He has little formal schooling, only attending class on occasion. As an adult, he took whatever work he could get, mostly manual labor and other simple jobs. Ghazwan spent years as a refugee, first in Syria, then in Turkey. He made his way to Europe and wandered more there, unable to find a country willing to keep him. Eventually he came to America, where he jumped at the chance to settle in Rutledge, Vermont. As much as Ghazwan enjoyed seeing different places (when people weren't shooting at him) he wants to settle down and start a family. However, he knows that he needs to get a job and a home before he can look for a wife, so he'll be able to support a family. His current lack of connections to people or place makes him feel lost and alone. Ghazwan typically wears practical men's clothes in black or other dark colors.
Qualities: Good (+2) Determination, Good (+2) Kinesthetic Intelligence, Good (+2) Strength, Good (+2) Survival, Good (+2) Teamwork
Poor (-2) Disconnected

See a map of Syria showing Ar Raqqah.


Yusuf Saeed -- He has fair skin, brown eyes, and short curly brown hair with a mustache and beard. He is slim with wiry muscles. His heritage is Syrian. He speaks Arabic, Kurmanji (Northern Kurdish), and Turkish. He is 37 years old in 2014.
Yusuf married at 26 to his first wife, Maysun. He has two children left from that marriage: Lisha (5) and Jadd (3). A firefight killed the older two children along with their mother. Because Yusuf could not simultaneously care for his children and work to support them, he needed a new wife immediately. He went about to the families in his neighborhood, presenting himself as an experienced husband and a good provider with a job as a construction foreman. Soon he found a bride who was happy to accept, especially since he already had children. Fariha Ragab was 16 when they married and is 17 in 2014. They were delighted when Fariha soon conceived.
The family lived in Hama, Syria. Not long after Yusuf married Fariha, the civil war destroyed their neighborhood -- house, construction company, schools, and all -- so they fled north to Turkey. Humanitarian workers took them to America because Fariha was pregnant. When they heard that Rutledge, Vermont was seeking refugees, Yusuf moved his family there because he thought all the trees would give him a chance to work with wood again. But his inability to speak English made it hard to find a job. His son Karif is born on September 19, 2014 and not long after that, Yusuf gets a job at Green Mountain Yard & Garden.
Qualities: Good (+2) Adaptable, Good (+2) Construction Worker, Good (+2) Dexterity, Good (+2) Family Man, Good (+2) Visual-Spatial Intelligence
Poor (-2) Bereaved

Child marriage is increasing in places such as Lebanon as a result of war, which makes refugees seek shelter in each other. While it often does more harm than good, some participants report positive outcomes.

See a map of Syria showing Hama.


Fariha Ragab -- She has fair skin, brown eyes, and long straight hair of dark brown. She is slim with moderate curves. Her heritage is Syrian. She speaks Arabic and is learning English. She is 17 years old in 2014.
When Yusuf Saeed came looking for a wife, 16-year-old Fariha eagerly took the opportunity to marry someone experienced and employed in a good job. Yusuf needed someone to care for his two surviving children from a previous marriage: Lisha (5) and Jadd (3). A firefight killed the older two children along with their mother. Since Fariha loved children, she considered them a further asset. Her one regret is that they don't love her back, missing their birth mother. However, Fariha soon conceived, which delighted her and Yusuf.
The family lived in Hama, Syria. Not long after Fariha married Yusuf, the civil war destroyed their neighborhood -- house, construction company, schools, and all -- so they fled north to Turkey. Humanitarian workers took them to America because Fariha was pregnant. Once there, they settled in Rutledge, Vermont. Ever the optimist, Fariha has done her best to make new friends, despite the language barrier. She adores her new baby Karif (born September 19, 2014), but sometimes her inexperience makes motherhood a challenge, and she has no female relatives to help with that.
Qualities: Good (+2) Constitution, Good (+2) Interpersonal Intelligence, Good (+2) Optimist, Good (+2) Patient
Poor (-2) Inexperienced

Child marriage is increasing in places such as Lebanon as a result of war, which makes refugees seek shelter in each other. While it often does more harm than good, some participants report positive outcomes.

See a map of Syria showing Hama.


Lisha Saeed -- She has pale skin, brown eyes, and long wavy brown hair. She is small with a round face, taking after her birth mother. Her heritage is Syrian. She speaks Arabic and is learning English. She is 5 years old in 2014. Lisha is the daughter of Yusuf and his first wife Maysun, stepdaughter of his second wife Fariha, older sister of Jadd (3), and older half-sister of newborn Karif.
A firefight killed Lisha's two older siblings along with their mother. Because Yusuf could not simultaneously care for his children and work to support them, he needed a new wife immediately. Fariha was eager to join the family, but Lisha and Jadd resent her presence, missing their mother. No matter what Fariha tries, Lisha doesn't want anything to do with her and grudgingly endures her presence in their home.
The family lived in Hama, Syria. Not long after Fariha married Yusuf, the civil war destroyed their neighborhood -- house, construction company, schools, and all -- so they fled north to Turkey. Humanitarian workers took them to America because Fariha was pregnant. Once there, they settled in Rutledge, Vermont. Lisha has made some effort to learn English, but none to make new friends. She is trying to get to know her new baby brother, but all he does is scream, so that's hard too.
Qualities: Good (+2) Loyal, Good (+2) Survivor
Poor (-2) Traumatic Grief


Jadd Saeed -- He has fair skin, brown eyes, and short straight hair of light brown. His heritage is Syrian. He speaks Arabic and is learning English. He is 3 years old in 2014. Jadd is the son of Yusuf and his first wife Maysun, stepson of his second wife Fariha, younger brother of Lisha (5) and older half-brother of newborn Karif.
A firefight killed Jadd's two oldest siblings along with their mother. Because Yusuf could not simultaneously care for his children and work to support them, he needed a new wife immediately. Fariha was eager to join the family, but Jadd and Lisha resent her presence, missing their mother. No matter what Fariha tries, Jadd can't seem to feel happy about much.
The family lived in Hama, Syria. Not long after Fariha married Yusuf, the civil war destroyed their neighborhood -- house, construction company, schools, and all -- so they fled north to Turkey. Humanitarian workers took them to America because Fariha was pregnant. Once there, they settled in Rutledge, Vermont. Jadd has made some effort to learn English, but doesn't have the energy to make new friends. However, he has inherited his father's knack for working with his hands, and adores construction toys like blocks and Duplo bricks.
Qualities: Good (+2) Construction Toys
Poor (-2) Depression


Karif Saeed -- He has fair skin, baby-blue eyes that will later turn brown, and short straight hair of dark brown. His heritage is Syrian. He was born on Friday, September 19, 2014. Karif is the son of Yusuf and his second wife Fariha, younger half-brother of Lisha (5) and Jadd (3).
A firefight killed Yusuf's two oldest children along with his first wife. Because Yusuf could not simultaneously care for his children and work to support them, he needed a new wife immediately. Fariha was eager to join the family. Much to their delight, she soon conceived.
The family lived in Hama, Syria. Not long after Fariha married Yusuf, the civil war destroyed their neighborhood -- house, construction company, schools, and all -- so they fled north to Turkey. Humanitarian workers took them to America because Fariha was pregnant. Once there, they settled in Rutledge, Vermont. Karif was born about 5 months later. He has a good set of lungs, and mostly uses them for screaming, because he also has colic.
Qualities: Good (+2) Lungs
Poor (-2) Colic


Bazyar Daber Ja'far -- He has toffee skin, hazel eyes, and short wavy brown hair with a mustache and beard. His heritage is mostly Syrian, but his grandfather was from Iran. He speaks Arabic. He is 54 in 2014. He was married with 9 children, of whom only the youngest son Hadis (14) survives. The four older boys were taken as soldiers and never returned, while the girls and their mother died for lack of medical care. That grief makes it hard for Bazyar to keep going, but he is determined to protect his last son. Both of them were wounded in a bombing. Bazyar dug through the rubble to find Hadis, injuring his hands in the process, but they healed fine. Hadis had worse injuries, causing serious facial scars, and an infection in the ragged wounds left him blind. Humanitarian workers sent them to America, where they later settled in Rutledge, Vermont. Bazyar is a farmer and wanted a rural location. He has no formal education, but instead learned on the job. He misses the farm work, but he has no money to buy land yet.
Qualities: Good (+2) Farmer, Good (+2) Father, Good (+2) Naturalistic Intelligence, Good (+2) Protective, Good (+2) Stamina
Poor (-2) Traumatic Loss

Most people use Arabic naming conventions in Syria. This formatted as: [personal name] [father’s personal name] [grandfather’s personal name]. For example, Youssef Khalil Hamed (male), Fadwa Khalil Hamed (female). It is important to understand that this naming convention does not involve the use of a surname.


Hadis Bazyar Daber -- He has butterscotch skin, brown eyes, and short wavy brown hair. His heart-shaped face is heavily scarred on the right side, with nerve damage that makes the skin sag, and he is blind in both eyes. His heritage is mostly Syrian, but his great-grandfather was from Iran. He speaks Arabic; he is learning English and its Braille system. He is 14 in 2014. He was the youngest of 9 children, of whom only Hadis survives. His four older brothers were taken as soldiers and never returned, while the girls and their mother died for lack of medical care. Hadis did well in school, but after his last brother was taken, had to drop out and help on the farm.
Hadis and Bazyar were both wounded in a bombing. Bazyar dug through the rubble to find Hadis, injuring his hands in the process, but they healed fine. Hadis had worse injuries, causing serious facial scars, and an infection in the ragged wounds left him blind. Sometimes he has residual twitches or pain in his face from the mangled nerves. Humanitarian workers sent the two of them to America, where they later settled in Rutledge, Vermont.
Hadis has a lot of patience and enjoys quiet activities. He is fascinated by the blind skills taught in America, finding a whole new world opened up to him. He loves the tactile color labels, the Play All games, and the Touchy-Feely books even though he can't read Braille yet. Hadis has a home tutor helping him learn blind skills, English, and school topics so he can catch up to American classes. He looks forward to when he can join the local school. All of this makes him hopeful about his future.
Qualities: Good (+2) Hopeful, Good (+2) Patient, Good (+2) Tactile Awareness
Poor (-2) Shrapnel Damage

Most people use Arabic naming conventions in Syria. This formatted as: [personal name] [father’s personal name] [grandfather’s personal name]. For example, Youssef Khalil Hamed (male), Fadwa Khalil Hamed (female). It is important to understand that this naming convention does not involve the use of a surname


Liyan -- Traditionally, Kurds do not use surnames. If pestered to provide one, she offers Mîlan, the name of her tribe. Liyan has tawny-copper skin, brown eyes, and long hair of dark brown with just a little wave. She is tall and muscular with a pear-shaped face and modest curves. Her heritage is Kurdish; she speaks Kurmanji (Northern Kurdish) and a little Turkish. She is struggling to learn English, Arabic, and French to connect with her new hosts and the other refugees. Liyan is 41 years old in 2014. Kurdish people span a variety of religions, and she has seen religious disputes tear the land apart, so she doesn't feel much attachment to any one faith. She is a political lesbian, strongly woman-identified and choosing not to form romantic/sexual ties with men.
Liyan grew up in Al-Qamishli, Syria. Due to unrest and cultural tendencies to devalue girls, she only managed a middle school education. After that, she worked a variety of practical jobs, often manual labor; she enjoys working outside in nature. She still studied on her own, learning about Kurdish nationalism and jineology (Rojavan feminism), eventually supporting the rise of Rojava.
As the Syrian Civil War broke out, Liyan took care of internally displaced refugees, especially women. When the fighting got too intense, she guided a band of mostly women and children as they crossed into Nusaybin, Turkey. Eventually some of them made their way to Europe and then America. When Liyan heard that Rutledge, Vermont was taking refugees, she pounced on the opportunity, thinking it lucky because her given name means "snowshoe." Unlike most of the shivering refugees, she is hot-blooded and eagerly looks forward to learning winter sports.
Qualities: Good (+2) Interpersonal Intelligence, Good (+2) Jineology, Good (+2) Cosmopolitan, Good (+2) Protective, Good (+2) Strength
Poor (-2) Linguistic Intelligence

Modern Kurdish names are mostly Arabic or Persian. The mother usually names her child. Kurds did not traditionally use surnames (last names), so most modern surnames are tribal designations or geographic locations.

The following is a list of tribes of Kurdish people from the geo-cultural region of Kurdistan and other regions.
Syria
Al-Hasakah and Raqqa Governorates
The following tribes are present in Al-Hasakah Governorate and Raqqa Governorate:[55][56]
Milan tribe


See a map of Syria showing the Rojava area.

Feminism, specifically jineology (the science of women), is central to the social revolution taking place in Rojava.

This map shows Kurdish inhabited parts of the Middle East. Here is one for Syrian cities including Al-Qamishli.


Dabeer Agassi -- He has modoré skin, brown eyes, and long wavy black hair. He has just a stubble of mustache and beard. He is tall and lean with a long face. His heritage is Iranian; he speaks Farsi and a little Arabic. He is 27 years old in 2014. Dabeer grew up in Iran, but persecution for being a Sunni Muslim and an activist made him flee to Iraq. He still has a price on his head in Iran. Falling in love with a Syrian woman, Almeda, Dabeer moved to Syria. They married when he was 25 and she was 20. They lived in Tall Kujik, Syria. There Dabeer wrote fractious articles for a newspaper; Almeda worked as a secretary for the same paper, but always wanted more in life.
After Dabeer got one death threat too many, they fled their city and escaped through Tall Abū Z̧āhir, Iraq. They used their connections among activists in various countries to make his way to America for its freedom of speech. Their journey was hectic but nothing too awful happened, leaving them in better shape than most refugees. Dabeer and Almeda decided to settle in Rutledge, Vermont because it's a cheap place to live and good for writers, but small enough to minimize the number of people who might get upset by their activism. Both of them want to attend college, but can't afford it yet.
Qualities: Good (+2) Activist, Good (+2) Frugal, Good (+2) Inspiring People, Good (+2) Tough, Good (+2) Writer
Poor (-2) Wanted in Iran

Weather Tall Kujik - Long term weather forecast

Weather Tall Abū Z̧āhir - Long term weather forecast

Iran is prevailingly Shi'ite Muslim. Iraq is largely Shi'ite Muslim but has a large Sunni minority. Syria includes many religions, but Sunni Muslims hold the majority.

Farsi is spoken across various Southern and Central Asian countries.


Almeda Agassi -- She is 22 years old in 2014. They have been married for 2 years. She is short and slim with a teardrop-shaped face and shallow curves. Her heritage is Syrian. She speaks Arabic and Farsi fluently, plus a little Armenian and French; she is learning English. She is 22 years old in 2014.
Almeda finished high school but lacked the opportunity to continue, though she wanted to. She agitated for women's rights, annoying her relatives and neighbors. Then she fell in love with a fellow activist, Dabeer. He moved to Syria. They married when he was 25 and she was 20. They lived in Tall Kujik, Syria. There Dabeer wrote fractious articles for a newspaper; Almeda worked as a secretary for the same paper, but always wanted more in life.
After Dabeer got one death threat too many, they fled their city and escaped through Tall Abū Z̧āhir, Iraq. They used their connections among activists in various countries to make their way to America for its freedom of speech. Their journey was hectic but nothing too awful happened, leaving them in better shape than most refugees. Almeda and Dabeer decided to settle in Rutledge, Vermont because it's a cheap place to live and good for writers, but small enough to minimize the number of people who might get upset by their activism. Both of them want to attend college, but can't afford it yet.
Qualities: Good (+2) Activist, Good (+2) Organized, Good (+2) Resilient, Good (+2) Secretary, Good (+2) Self-Defense
Poor (-2) Abrasive
Tags: community, cyberfunded creativity, ethnic studies, fantasy, fishbowl, poetry, reading, weblit, writing
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