Elizabeth Barrette (ysabetwordsmith) wrote,
Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith

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Poem: "The Highest Form of Self-Respect"

This poem came out of the July 7, 2020 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] dialecticdreamer. It also fills the "acts of kindness" square in my 7-1-20 card for the Winterfest in July Bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by a pool with [personal profile] fuzzyred, [personal profile] technoshaman, and [personal profile] mama_kestrel. It belongs to the Mercedes thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.


"The Highest Form of Self-Respect"

[Wednesday, October 1, 2014]

Chief Marquez looked over
the room of assembled cops
and assorted support staff.

"We're here to address issues
raised by the misconduct of
a police officer and aftermath
handled in unsatisfactory ways
by some of our officers," she said.
"Holly, if you would summarize?"

"First, Rachel Sutcliffe broke
a number of laws in stalking
her former boyfriend and son,
including harassment that spread
to other police," said Holly Fuente.
"There will be a presentation on
Friday about the importance of
not sharing or acting on gossip."

"Everyone not otherwise occupied
is expected to attend, unless you
can document similar training within
the last year," said Chief Marquez.
"That's an order. Holly, back to you."

"Second, I was appalled by the lack of
professional skills in the interviewing of
secondary victims," said Holly. "I've already
addressed that with the offending officers and
I'll handle the EFA. We want to make sure
this doesn't happen again with anyone else
so we're taking steps to prevent that."

"I know that we're making big changes
in this department," said Chief Marquez.
"If anyone feels uncomfortable with those,
or unable to meet current expectations,
please see me to discuss a transfer
or resignation. I'll help as best I can."

"Moving on to concrete apologies,
the department will be offering
a variety of classes and activities,
both in house and in the community,"
Holly said. "We hope this will help
repair the relationship damage."

"But won't that make people
lose respect for the department?"
Roland Bergen said, frowning.

"No one will respect us if
we don't respect ourselves,"
Chief Marquez replied. "It is
the highest form of self-respect
to admit our errors and mistakes
and make amends for them."

Anthony Fletcher sighed. "Besides,
we've already lost enough respect from
that woman's misbehavior and then
our own fumbling of the followup,"
he said. "We need to fix that."

"We're working on it," Holly said.
"We already have some plans."

"First, this department will assist
Mr. Clayton in straightening out
the paperwork disrupted by his need
to hide from a stalker that we not only
failed to protect him from but actively
abetted," said Chief Marquez. "Anthony,
I'd like you to offer that, but he's free
to choose someone else if he prefers."

"Yes, Chief," said Anthony. "I think
I have ..." He pulled out his fan wallet
of certifications and thumbed through it.
"... yeah, my Red Tape Assistance card is
still good and I got Community Outreach
renewed. So I can help Mr. Clayton fix
the paperwork for him and his son."

"Hope you're up to talking them through
Descendancy Divorce," someone muttered.

Chief Marquez cleared her throat. "That
would be at the discretion of Mr. Clayton
the younger," she said. "No speculation.
I myself will cover the topic of college or
other continuing education with him,
and I'm donating my vacation fund
to that as my own concrete apology."

"I'm supervising Acts of Kindness,"
said Holly. "Anyone who wants
to volunteer should come to
the EFA office later today and
choose from the signup sheets."

"We also need people to lead
outreach sessions so the community
as well as the department is aware of
connections that need care in a crisis,"
said Chief Marquez. "These include
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse, Signs
of Vulnerability, and Fractal Families."

Peter Rybokov raised a hand.
"I'll take Fractal Families,"
he said. "I'm familiar with
the Tulls and other folks who
have creative structures."

"Done," said Chief Marquez.
"I'm sure you'll handle it well."

"I uh, could help with Signs of
Vulnerability if you schedule it
for next week," Roland said,
shuffling in place. "My class
on Trauma-Informed Care is
this weekend. But you, uh,
might want someone with
more experience to lead it."

"I'll be happy to take the lead,"
Holly said. "That class works
better with two facilitators so we
can demonstrate roleplaying."

"Oh hey, I actually have
a cert for that," Roland said.

"When you pass TIC, bring
both to my office," Holly said.

The other assignments were
soon handed out, and then
the meeting concluded.

Chief Marquez headed for
the doors, along with Peter.

Outside, a cluster of protesters
had joined the original two.

Demand Police Transparency
and Accountability,
read one sign.
Propped on the grass, another board
displayed a list of citizen demands.

Torrin had set up a portable table for
his laptop, but his gray T-shirt was
still legible: Protect the Vulnerable.

As Peter passed, Torrin called out,
"Hey, Officer Rybokov, can I
interview you for my report?"

"That depends. What are you
writing about?" Peter asked.

"Police relationships with
the community," Torrin said.
"When that rude lady lied at
the Everything Store, you
were nice to us. I want
to cover all perspectives."

"That's very responsible of
you," Peter said. "Yes, you
can interview me, but I need
to talk with Loudmouth first."

"Hey, Smoky," said Loudmouth.
"What brings you out here?"

Her black T-shirt read,
Respect Existence or
Expect Resistance
.

"Fulfillment of a line item,"
Peter said, kneeling in front of
the signboard labeled Demands.

He found the one that read,
Police meeting to discuss amends.
"This is the one that's for us to do
internally, right?" he asked.

"Yeah, the one involving
police and community dynamics
is Family meeting with External Affairs,"
Loudmouth said, pointing to another line.

"Then we're done with this one now,"
Peter said. He put a checkmark by
Police meeting, dated and initialed it.

Loudmouth grinned at him. "Well, you
just validated my job fulfillment today."

Chief Marquez nodded and then
headed back to her office.

Things were going to be okay.

* * *

Notes:

Arminda Marquez -- She has sorrel skin, brown eyes, and wavy brown hair usually pulled back in a bun. Her heritage is African, American, and Hispanic. She speaks English, Mandarin Chinese, and Spanish. Arminda is 45 years old in August of 2014. She is married with 5 children: a son (19), twin daughters (16), a son (11), and a daughter (8). Her husband stays home to take care of the kids and do odd jobs such as small engine repair. They live in Mercedes, California. Bold and tough, Arminda makes an good police chief. She was promoted recently after the former chief left under embarrassing circumstances. She has a knack for strategic thinking, but no patience with people who try to play games with her.
Qualities: Expert (+4) Bold, Expert (+4) Tough, Good (+2) Mother, Good (+2) Police Chief, Good (+2) Strategic Thinking
Poor (-2) Don't Play Games With Me

Anthony Fletcher -- He has pinkish-fair skin, brown eyes, and black hair buzzed short. He is short and stocky. Anthony earned an Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice with a Certificate in Human Services at Mercedes College in Mercedes California. He went on to attend Basic Police Academy at the South Bay Regional Public Training in San Jose, California. Currently he serves in the police department of Mercedes, California. Anthony is slow on the uptake, but once he realizes that he's made a mistake, he's good at correcting it and learning from the experience. As a hobby, he enjoys cooperative games and other group activities.
Qualities: Good (+2) Citizen, Good (+2) Cooperative Games, Good (+2) Learning from Mistakes, Good (+2) Linguistic Intelligence, Good (+2) Sturdy
Poor (-2) Slow on the Uptake

Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice
Allied health, Business, and Public Safety
at Mercedes College in Mercedes California

The Criminal Justice program is multifaceted and serves the educational needs of both pre-service and law enforcement professionals as well as individuals interested in learning about the field. The program leads to an Associate’s
Degree in Criminal Justice, and transfer to Baccalaureate degree programs and or a Certificate of Achievement. Additionally, the first two of three modules of the Modular Police Academy are offered to qualified students. These courses meet the State of California, Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training (POST) requirements.
Career Opportunities
The demand for qualified men and women in the criminal justice field is present today more than ever before. Today’s practitioners need to be able to deal with traditional law enforcement functions, and the complex social issues of our diverse society. Professional opportunities in law enforcement and related fields may be found on the federal, state, and local level as well as in the private sector and industry. Each agency or private entity provides unique career opportunities for the trained recruit. Many related career fields such as criminologist, fingerprint analyst, communications specialists, crime analyst, researcher, and educator are available.
Highlights
Academic and hands on experiences degree (5/08)
A.A. - Criminal Justice (21150.AA)
For an Associate in Arts Degree in Criminal Justice, students must complete
the graduation requirements and the 24-unit curriculum listed below. These
courses must be in addition to the basic graduation requirements, and a
2.0 GPA or higher must be earned in each class.
Program Student Learning Outcomes
A. Demonstrate at the entry level an understanding of the fundamental
principles, laws, and processes related to the American judicial
system and individual constitutional rights.
B. Recognize at the entry level the social, political, economic, and
cultural context within the criminal justice system and responsibilities
to the community.
C. Demonstrate at the entry level critical thinking skills, the ability to
analyze and solve problems using logical and creative methods.
D. Demonstrate at the entry level effective written, verbal and nonverbal
communication skills.

Units
CRIM-01 Criminology ...............................................................3
CRIM-03 Criminal Procedures..................................................3
CRIM-04 Criminal Law .............................................................3
CRIM-05 Community and Human Relations ............................3
CRIM-06 Introduction to Evidence............................................3
CRIM-10 Writing for Criminal Justice .......................................3
CRIM-37 Communication and Ethics in Law Enforcement.......3
Plus three units from the following electives:
CRIM-39 Police Tactics ............................................................1
CRIM-42A 832 PC Arrest Methods..........................................1.5
CRIM-42B 832 PC Firearms.......................................................1


CERTIFICATE in Human Services
at Mercedes College in Mercedes, California
A Certificate of Achievement will be awarded upon the satisfactory
completion of the curriculum listed below.
Program Student Learning Outcomes
A. Recognize community resources that facilitate the helping process,
including the importance of advocating for community empowerment,
participation, and change.
B. Explain the historical development and philosophical paradigms of
the social work, social welfare, and human services systems.
C. Understand and identify the roles of a human services professional,
emphasizing the Helping Process, basic helping skills, identifying
behaviors of challenging clients, and the application of crisis
intervention strategies.

Core: Units
COOP-41AHS Cooperative Education...........................................2-4
HMSV-20 Social Welfare...........................................................3
HMSV-21 Human Behavior and the Helping Process ...............3
HMSV-22 Survey and Utilization of Community Resources......3
HMSV-41 Case management....................................................3
HMSV-42 Introduction to Counseling Skills...............................3
HMSV-43 Ethics in Counseling..................................................3
HMSV-44 Leadership and Counseling in Groups......................3

Take 2 courses from the following: ............................................................6
HUM-15 Comparative Cultures (3)
PSYC-01A Introduction to Psychology (3)
Total Units ...........................................................................32-34


Basic Police Academy
at the South Bay Regional Public Training in San Jose, California


This full-time, 888-hour intensive course satisfies the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) minimum training requirements for California entry-level peace officers. The course typically meets Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m, is approximately six months in duration and is designed for employed or aspiring peace officer recruits who can dedicate their full attention and efforts towards completing the program. The full-time Intensive Academy requires a strong commitment by the recruits and their families. Upon completion the student can apply to police agencies as a Regular Peace Officer.
The Basic Police Academy course includes fundamental principles, procedures and techniques of law enforcement, including: Criminal Law, Patrol Procedures, Cultural Diversity, Investigative Procedures, Report Writing, Defensive Tactics, Firearms, Leadership, Ethics, Community Policing, Police Vehicle Operations, Traffic Enforcement, Accident Investigation, Handling Emotional Situations and First Aid/CPR. The course also includes a challenging physical conditioning requirement that will prepare academy students for police service.
Prerequisites
Each Basic Police Academy applicant must:
• Pass the POST Reading/Writing Test (see test info and schedule);
• Pass the Physical Agility WSTB Test (see test info and schedule); and
• Complete the Academy Application process including medical clearance, proof of medical insurance, DMV history, DOJ Firearms Clearance.
• Adhere to the Basic Police Academy Student Needs List
• After successful completion of the POST Reading/Writing Test and the WSTB Test, submit your scores on the Basic Police Academy Pre-Registration Form.

Regular Basic Course Training Specifications
In July 1993, the Commission adopted training specifications as its method of specifying the minimum, mandated curriculum for the Regular Basic Course. Listed below are the individual learning domains that make up the course curriculum.
Copyright Notice
• Regular Basic Course Minimum Hourly Requirements (doc)
• LD 01 Leadership, Professionalism and Ethics (doc)
• LD 02 Criminal Justice System (doc)
• LD 03 Principled Policing in the Community (doc)
• LD 04 Victimology/Crisis Intervention (doc)
• LD 05 Introduction to Criminal Law (doc)
• LD 06 Property Crimes (doc)
• LD 07 Crimes Against Persons (doc)
• LD 08 General Criminal Statutes (doc)
• LD 09 Crimes Against Children (doc)
• LD 10 Sex Crimes (doc)
• LD 11 Juvenile Law and Procedure (doc)
• LD 12 Controlled Substances (doc)
• LD 13 ABC Law (doc)
• LD 15 Laws of Arrest (doc)
• LD 16 Search and Seizure (doc)
• LD 17 Presentation of Evidence (doc)
• LD 18 Investigative Report Writing (doc)
• LD 19 Vehicle Operations (doc)
• LD 20 Use of Force/Deescalation (docx)
• LD 21 Patrol Techniques (doc)
• LD 22 Vehicle Pullovers (doc)
• LD 23 Crimes in Progress (doc)
• LD 24 Handling Disputes/Crowd Control (doc)
• LD 25 Domestic Violence (doc)
• LD 26 Unusual Occurrences (doc)
• LD 27 Missing Persons (doc)
• LD 28 Traffic Enforcement (docx)
• LD 29 Traffic Accident Investigation (doc)
• LD 30 Crime Scenes, Evidence, and Forensics (doc)
• LD 31 Custody (doc)
• LD 32 Lifetime Fitness (doc)
• LD 33 Arrest and Control (doc)
• LD 34 First Aid and CPR (doc)
• LD 35 Firearms/Chemical Agents (doc)
• LD 36 Information Systems (doc)
• LD 37 People with Disabilities (doc)
• LD 38 Gang Awareness (doc)
• LD 39 Crimes Against the Justice System (doc)
• LD 40 Weapons Violations (doc)
• LD 41 Hazardous Materials Awareness (doc)
• LD 42 Cultural Diversity/Discrimination (doc)
• LD 43 Emergency Management (doc)


Holly Fuente -- She has tawny-fair skin, hazel eyes, and short brown hair. She is homely and doesn't care. Her heritage is American and Hispanic; she speaks English and Spanish. She is 44 years old. Holly is married with two children, a son and a daughter. They live in Mercedes, California where she serves in the local police department as the Emotional First Aid Officer. Unlike most EFAides, she is assertive and protective rather than soft and nurturing. She came to it through the Army and has experience helping people in war zones. After leaving the military, Holly took advantage of the educational benefits to earn a Bachelor of Science in Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Certificate in Emotional First Aid. She still favors practical clothes, especially olive green and camo.
Qualities: Good (+2) Army Veteran, Good (+2) Constitution, Good (+2) Emotional First Aid Officer, Good (+2) Emotional Intelligence, Good (+2) Formidable
Poor (-2) Homely

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)
at the University of California-Berkeley

Not all programs are offered for completion at each campus or through Berkeley College Online®. Please review the academic program pages (https://berkeleycollege.edu/academics.htm) for information on where each program is offered. Additionally, all students may be required to take some courses at another campus or online. The Career Development and Internship courses are only offered online.
PROGRAM LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Course Requirements
MAJOR CORE COURSES
CIS1115 Computer Applications 3 Credits
Provides an introduction to computer technology with an emphasis on applications. Students learn to use software, such as Microsoft Windows, Word, PowerPoint, and Excel.
JUS1100 Introduction to Justice Studies 3 Credits
Introduces the major institutions of justice in society. Topics include justice in a free society, the police, courts, correctional services, the balance of individual rights and public order, law and public policy, and factors affecting the future of the justice system.
JUS1110 Communication Skills for Criminal Justice Professionals
3 Credits
Examines the nature and importance of communication within the criminal justice system. Students develop reportwriting skills and an understanding of the impact report writing has on the investigation and prosecution of crime, as well as on the administration of justice.
JUS2201 Criminal Procedure 3 Credits
Introduces the methods and body of rules by which criminal law functions in a free society. Topics include the collection and handling of evidence in a crime, police procedure in regard to search and seizure, emergency police searches, vehicle searches, confessions, and arrest and interrogation procedures.
Prerequisite: JUS1100
JUS2205 Criminal Law 3 Credits
Introduces the study of criminal law. Students will learn about general categories of criminal law (felonies and misdemeanors) and the various defenses to criminal charges (alibi, justification, excuse, conspiracy, and legal insanity).
Prerequisite: JUS1100
JUS2293 Internship 3 Credits
Students work in a position related to their course of study while at the same time completing online course requirements – including focused online discussions and special online projects – that integrate the skills and knowledge learned through their degree program.
Prerequisite: Departmental permission
JUS3307 Corrections, Probation, and Parole 3 Credits
Introduces the history and current state of corrections, probation, and parole in the United States. Topics include the roles of corrections, probation, and parole officers; different types of jails and prisons; restorative justice; community-based correctional models; and extra-institutional supervision of convicted offenders.
Prerequisite: JUS1100
JUS4406 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 3 Credits
Examines the process of academic research with particular attention to research designs, data collection, and sampling. This course will address the procedures and methods necessary to conduct a research study in criminal justice. Methodological problems and ethical issues will be considered in detail.
Prerequisites: JUS1100, SOC2220, MAT2215
JUS4483 Internship 3 Credits
Students work in a position related to their course of study while at the same time completing online course requirements – including focused online discussions and special online projects - that integrate the skills and knowledge learned through their degree program.
Prerequisite: Departmental permission
SOC2218 Police and Society 3 Credits
Introduces the history and traditions of American policing. Examines the role of the police in advancing justice in a democratic society. Topics include law enforcement operations and strategies, such as profiling, organizational structure, community affairs, police use of force, and various major concerns in public policy.
SOC2220 Criminology 3 Credits
Introduces the various causes of crime in a free society. This course considers factors such as free will, biology, and other possible causes, such as DNA, nutrition, hormones, and subcultures of violence.

Justice Studies Electives*- 9 Credits

CAREER DEVELOPMENT COURSES
CDV2000 Career Development I 3 Credits
Introduces students to the fundamentals of career development and planning. Students focus on setting appropriate career goals based on self-assessment in alignment with skills and competencies. Students learn how to write a professional resume and cover letter, how to communicate effectively in multiple media, and how to develop time management skills to help them succeed both academically and professionally.
*Note: CDV2000 and CDV3000 are only offered as 7 week courses.
CDV3000 Career Development II 3 Credits
Focuses on the job application and interview process. Students learn how to develop a field search for employment opportunities and apply for jobs in their fields of study. Students observe and critique mock interviews and learn how to negotiate salary offers.
Prerequisite: CDV2000
*Note: CDV2000 and CDV3000 are only offered as 7 week courses.

LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE CORE COURSES
ENG1105 Writing and Research 3 Credits
An introduction to expository writing through a comprehensive survey of forms of composition. Students are taught to use words with precision and strengthen their understanding and application of grammatical and rhetorical principles. Students are encouraged to appreciate and incorporate the principles of academic and professional writing.

HUM2225 Introduction to Ethics 3 Credits
Introduces the study of ethics and moral philosophy, including its historical development, the major figures within that history, and ethical and moral issues that face us today. This course presents the ideas of great thinkers throughout history and encourages students’ own thinking on various ethical and moral issues.

SOC1123 Psychology of Adjustment 3 Credits
Explores the psychological principles involved in coping with the challenges of moving through changes in life stages and life circumstances. Topics include stress management, communication, time management, healthy relationships, positive thinking, conflict management, and balancing home, education, and work.
English Elective- 3 Credits
Humanities Elective- 3 Credits
Liberal Arts Electives**- 24 Credits
FREE ELECTIVES- 15 Credits


Emotional First Aid
Major 48 credits, EFA certification 30 credits.

The EFA major is more than required for certification as an Emotional First Aide. It is intended for students who want a Bachelor of Science with Emotional First Aide certification, or who plan to transfer and pursue Emotional Trauma Care or other advanced work.

The EFA certification begins with this core. (12 credits)
EFA 101 Introduction to Emotional First Aid
EFA 102 Personal Safety and Self-Care
EFA 111 Emotional Crisis Response
EFA 112 Prevention & Treatment of Traumatic Stress

The following class may be taken as a 1-credit lab alongside any EFA class. Majors must take it at least twice, certification students at least once.
EFA 091 Roleplay & Imaginative Exercises

Choose a basic Psychology class (3 credits) and electives. Majors choose 3 electives (9 credits) while certification students choose 1 elective (3 credits).
PSYCH 4 Emotional Intelligence 2 Units

Electives:
PSYCH 240B Proseminar: Emotional, Social, and Psychopathological Development 3 Units

Majors choose 4 classes (12 credits) about things that need EFA. Certification students choose 2 classes (6 credits).
Domestic Abuse
Sexual Assault

Electives: Majors choose 4 credits of electives from any listed classes. Certificate students choose 2 credits.
PSYCH 156 Human Emotion 3 Units
Substance Abuse

Conclude with practical classes. Majors take EFA 4011, 4012, or 4013 and EFA 4021 (6 credits). Certificate students take 1 class from EFA 4011, 4012, or 4013 (3 credits).
EFA 4012 Internship


Roland Bergen -- He has pinkish-fair skin, brown eyes, and short brown hair. He is tall and sturdy. Roland earned a Basic Police Academy Certificate of Achievement at Fresno City College in Fresno, California. Currently he and his wife live in Mercedes, California where he serves on the police department. He does well at spotting details, but not so much at seeing the big picture. Most of his friends are other cops or guys who frequent the same neighborhood bar. Roland prefers individual to team sports, because he tends to get pouty when thwarted, and people don't like that.
Qualities: Good (+2) Bar Friends, Good (+2) Detail Oriented, Good (+2) Individual Sports, Good (+2) Kinesthetic Intelligence, Good (+2) Strong
Poor (-2) Pouty

Basic Police Academy Certificate of Achievement
at Fresno City College in Fresno, California

The Basic Police Academy Certificate of Achievement program offers curriculum to prepare students with the knowledge and skills necessary to complete a law enforcement field training program certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Employment opportunities are found in both government and private enterprise where law enforcement principles are applied. The basic academy is offered in three different formats; the intensive 40 hours per week format, the 24 hour per week night academy extended format, and the modular format. Hours per week may vary slightly according to schedule.

Major Requirements: 38-48.5 units
A grade of “C” or better is required in the following courses
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT
(F.8921.CA)
C-ID Units
AJ 270A, Basic Police Academy - Part 1 17.5
AJ 270B, Basic Police Academy – Part 2 20.5
25.5

Regular Basic Course Training Specifications
In July 1993, the Commission adopted training specifications as its method of specifying the minimum, mandated curriculum for the Regular Basic Course. Listed below are the individual learning domains that make up the course curriculum.
Copyright Notice
• Regular Basic Course Minimum Hourly Requirements (doc)
• LD 01 Leadership, Professionalism and Ethics (doc)
• LD 02 Criminal Justice System (doc)
• LD 03 Principled Policing in the Community (doc)
• LD 04 Victimology/Crisis Intervention (doc)
• LD 05 Introduction to Criminal Law (doc)
• LD 06 Property Crimes (doc)
• LD 07 Crimes Against Persons (doc)
• LD 08 General Criminal Statutes (doc)
• LD 09 Crimes Against Children (doc)
• LD 10 Sex Crimes (doc)
• LD 11 Juvenile Law and Procedure (doc)
• LD 12 Controlled Substances (doc)
• LD 13 ABC Law (doc)
• LD 15 Laws of Arrest (doc)
• LD 16 Search and Seizure (doc)
• LD 17 Presentation of Evidence (doc)
• LD 18 Investigative Report Writing (doc)
• LD 19 Vehicle Operations (doc)
• LD 20 Use of Force/Deescalation (docx)
• LD 21 Patrol Techniques (doc)
• LD 22 Vehicle Pullovers (doc)
• LD 23 Crimes in Progress (doc)
• LD 24 Handling Disputes/Crowd Control (doc)
• LD 25 Domestic Violence (doc)
• LD 26 Unusual Occurrences (doc)
• LD 27 Missing Persons (doc)
• LD 28 Traffic Enforcement (docx)
• LD 29 Traffic Accident Investigation (doc)
• LD 30 Crime Scenes, Evidence, and Forensics (doc)
• LD 31 Custody (doc)
• LD 32 Lifetime Fitness (doc)
• LD 33 Arrest and Control (doc)
• LD 34 First Aid and CPR (doc)
• LD 35 Firearms/Chemical Agents (doc)
• LD 36 Information Systems (doc)
• LD 37 People with Disabilities (doc)
• LD 38 Gang Awareness (doc)
• LD 39 Crimes Against the Justice System (doc)
• LD 40 Weapons Violations (doc)
• LD 41 Hazardous Materials Awareness (doc)
• LD 42 Cultural Diversity/Discrimination (doc)
• LD 43 Emergency Management (doc)

* * *

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them."
-- Dale E. Turner

Red Tape Assistance is a certification in Terramagne-America, often taken by office workers, public servants, or first responders. This prepares them to help people fill out unfamiliar and confusing paperwork. There are also specialists whose whole job entails doing that for vulnerable people such as immigrants or the disabled, but that's more advanced training. The certification just covers everyday situations that come up in many jobs.

Descendency Divorce is one legal term for disowning a parent. Terramagne-America allows for ex-parents and ex-children as well as ex-spouses. The most common reason is abuse. It provides a way of severing the legal relationship so that the abuser cannot use that to make further trouble for the victim(s), and the ex-parental income is no longer calculated into college or other aid programs.

It has to be okay to make mistakes, because everyone makes mistakes and that's how we learn. Create an environment that is resilient about mistakes. This encourages people to deal with them and learn from them instead of hiding them and making matters worse. Learn to flow around them. Practice managed risk and look for ways to make safe mistakes. There's even a game for learning this. In one of my online classes I assigned students to try a project at the edge of their current skill level, which pretty much guarantees something will go a bit pear-shaped. Remember, if you're not making any mistakes, you're not learning, you're coasting!

Apologies need several parts to be effective. Things will inevitably go wrong between people, and you need to understand how to repair your relationships. Here is an example from the kink community. Follow the steps to earn back broken trust. Even in the best-run offices, sometimes things go amiss. To avoid a negative impact on clients, explain the situation and offer a concrete apology. However, understand that faking either an apology or forgiveness tends to make matters worse instead of better. Some people demand an apology even if obviously insincere, while others don't want to hear it unless it is genuine.

Torrin's T-shirt reads, Protect the Vulnerable. Loudmouth's T-shirt reads, Respect Existence or Expect Resistance.

Protesters demand police transparency.
Tags: activism, community, cyberfunded creativity, fantasy, fishbowl, poem, poetry, reading, safety, weblit, writing
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