Elizabeth Barrette (ysabetwordsmith) wrote,
Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith

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Poem: "The Truest Writers"

This poem came out of the May 5, 2020 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired and sponsored by Shirley Barrette. It also fills "The troubled heart" square in my 5-1-20 card for the Sumerian Me Bingo fest. This poem belongs to the Shiv thread of the Polychrome Heroics series. It is the first in the set, followed by "Those Who See Language," "A Linguistic Process," "A Living Element," "Based on the Mistake," and "The Professor's Keychain."


"The Truest Writers"

[Monday, June 4, 2007]

Everett was in the library when
he heard a familiar voice.
"Everett, just the man I
was hoping to find!"

"Hi, Professor Burr,"
Everett said as he
turned around. "What
can I do for you today?"

They had met when
Everett was working on
his Master's Degree in English
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha.
Everett had enjoyed the classes that
he had taken with Professor Burr; it was
nice that they'd both moved to Lincoln.

"I'm wondering if you might like to pick up
a part-time teaching gig," said Professor Burr.

"My wife just had our second kid, so yes,
more hours would definitely improve
our household budget," said Everett.
"What kind of teaching is this?"

"I need another teacher for
my prison-to-college program
at the Nebraska Penitentiary,"
said Professor Burr. "Most of
the inmates there are black
or Hispanic, so I'm trying
to diversify the faculty some."

"You just want the black guy,"
Everett said, narrowing his eyes.

"I won't deny that's part of it,"
said Professor Burr. "The inmates
need to see that men of color can
succeed, and you've done that."

"Fair enough," Everett conceded.
"What else were you thinking?"

"Mostly I want the guy with
credentials for inclusive practices
and an interest in diverse literature,"
said Professor Burr. "These students
won't care about dead white writers."

"Guess I can't argue with that one,"
Everett said. "You think I can help?"

"I think you can get them hooked with
Robert Hayden and Lorna Dee Cervantes,"
said Professor Burr. "They need to see
that people like them can write about
things they actually care about, things
that matter in their everyday lives,
not just ivory-tower literary stuff."

"You're thinking about the canon
that I wrote for independent study, with
materials for introducing students to
Latino literature," Everett said.

"It's a start," said Professor Burr.
"You've got the background in
Black Studies, too, which you'll
need just as much. Ideally, I want
the faculty and the curriculum to match
the student body as closely as possible."

"The truest writers are those who see
language not as a linguistic process
but as a living element," Everett quoted.

"Exactly!" said Professor Burr. "Students
need to realize that reading and writing
are part of life, not just homework."

Everett nodded. "Okay, I see your point,"
he said. "I'm sorry I snapped at you."

"If people tokened me all the time, I'd be
touchy about it too," said Professor Burr.

"Thanks," Everett said. "I need the job.
I just don't know whether I can work
like that. I mean, prison's rough..."

"If you don't feel like you could tolerate
the environment, I will respect that,"
said Professor Burr. "If you're worried
about the inmates themselves, though,
let me just say that crime is less often
about the lack of material goods and
more often about the troubled heart."

Everett waffled a hand. "I can't say
I'm eager to walk into a prison when
I've been very careful to stay out,"
he said. "Mostly, though, I'm
wondering how safe it is."

"As safe as it can be,"
said Professor Burr. "I won't
deny there are some very bad boys
in there, but they rarely come to class.
Also, the prison has a certain, mmm,
pecking order of its own; the steadies
do their part to keep things smooth."

"Does that actually work?" Everett said.

"Surprisingly well," said Professor Burr.
"They get perks for maintaining safety.
Since I added college-level classes
in 2007, recidivism is down a quarter.
I'm hoping to get it down by a third."

"Wow, those are good numbers,"
Everett admitted. "It's working."

"It helps that I just talked
some colleges into accepting
those credits toward degrees,"
Professor Burr said proudly.
"Listen, why don't we start small?
You teach one class in the fall --
any topic you like -- and if you
hate it, I won't bother you again."

Everett ran a quick calculation in
his head and figured that one class
would just about cover their diaper bill,
which would be a huge help, without
cutting into his family time too much.

"All right," he said. "One class.
I'll do Introduction to Latino Literature,
since I already have that reading list
in the can. Lessons won't take long."

"Excellent," said Professor Burr.
"You might want to ask a librarian
about reading levels, though -- most
of the guys in prison read at third or
fourth grade level, plenty lower, and
very few higher than that. We teach
from grade school to college levels."

"Yeah, I'll need to touch up the list,"
Everett said. "Maybe I'll just batch
the readings by topic and let students
pick whichever title they want to read."

"That should work," said Professor Burr.
"These guys don't get many choices,
and they need all the practice they
can get in making good ones."

Everett made a note to include
a lesson on how to choose books
and how to find your comfort level.

He was oddly looking forward to this.

* * *

Notes:

Everett Howard -- He has toffee skin, black eyes, and short nappy black hair with a beard and mustache. His heritage is primarily African-American with a dab of Chinese and one Oglala ancestor. Everett gets cold easily, and prefers to dress in layers. He is 35 in 2015. He lives in a modest suburban house with his wife and their four children. Everett got married in 2004; his first child was born in 2005, the second in May of 2007, the third in June of 2009, and the fourth in August of 2011. They participate in a lot of community activities together.
In 2001, Everett earned a Bachelor of Science in Education - Secondary Education with a Concentration in Inclusive Practices alongside an English minor at the University of Nebraska-Omaha. In 2003, he went on to get a Master of Arts in English with graduate minors in Latino/Latin American Studies and Black Studies. In 2008, he earned a Graduate Certificate in Developing Literacy Expertise Through Responsive Classroom Teaching from Lesley University online. In 2010, he got a Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing through Minnesota State University, Mankato online. In 2012, he earned a Graduate Academic Certificate in Storytelling through the University of North Texas. In 2014, he got a Graduate Certificate in Creative Teaching through Drama through the Catholic University of America online.
Everett teaches at the Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln. His classes include Reading, Writing (nonfiction, fiction, and poetry), Literature, and Theatre. He also helps the inmates to analyze their academic strengths and weaknesses, then develop a plan to meet their educational goals. He uses primarily black and Hispanic authors, matching the ethnic mix of this prison, to show his students that people like them can make great literature and it can deal with topics relevant to their own experiences. Everett loves literature, loves his job, and often fails to remember that not everyone else is necessarily excited about the same things he is. As a result, he tends to get along poorly with introverts.
In 2009, Everett started a Book Club with in-person meetings (privileged and standard wings) and online forums (private wing). In 2011, he launched a Creative Writing Club with similar parameters. In 2013, he introduced a Storytelling Club for both traditional and original material, using the same parameters as the previous clubs. In 2015, Everett convinced Warden Lincoln to approve a new Drama Club for inmates in the standard (with permission) or privileged (at will) wings. These efforts have supported writers of color, and encouraged inmates to develop creative hobbies both for personal expression and for broadening representation.
Qualities: Master (+6) Linguistic Intelligence, Expert (+4) Optimist, Expert (+4) Prison Teacher, Good (+2) Activist, Good (+2) Roleplaying, Good (+2) Tireless
Poor (-2) Excitable

Education - Secondary Education, Bachelor of Science
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Requirements
A candidate for a degree and/or teaching endorsement in grades 6-12 or 7-12 must complete the following course requirements:
Code Title Credits
TED 3550 SECONDARY CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 3
TED 3690 LITERACY AND LEARNING 3
TED 4000 SPECIAL METHODS IN THE CONTENT AREA 3
TED 4600 CLINICAL PRACTICE AND SEMINAR: ELEMENTARY OR SECONDARY LEVEL 12
Total Credits 21
Course List
Courses Required for Major (Core Curriculum)
Code Title Credits
Professional Education Sequence
TED 2100 EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS 3
TED 2200 HUMAN RELATIONS FOR BIAS-FREE CLASSROOMS 3
TED 2400 PLANNING FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING 6
TED 2380 DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING IN ADOLESCENCE 3
Total Credits 15
Course List
A candidate for a degree and/or teaching endorsement in grades K-12 must complete the following course requirements:
Code Title Credits
SPED 3800 DIFFERENTIATION AND INCLUSIVE PRACTICES 3
TED 4640 K-12 CLINICAL PRACTICE AND SEMINAR ELEMENTARY/SECONDARY 12
TED 4650 CLINICAL PRACTICE AND SEMINAR: ELEMENTARY OR SECONDARY LEVEL 1 6
Methods within their content area
Total Credits 21


Inclusive Practices
Code Title Credits
ENGL 4750 COMPOSITION THEORY & PEDAGOGY 3
ENGL 4860 MODERN FAMILIAR ESSAY 3
TED 3750 TEACHING GRAMMAR IN CONTEXT 3
TED 4590 TEACHING AND LEARNING IN DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS 3
TED 4660 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 3
Select one of the following: 3
ENGL 2450 AMERICAN LITERATURE I 3
Select one of the following: 3
ENGL 2420 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LANGUAGE STUDIES
Select one of the following electives: 3
ENGL/BLST 2260 BLACK SHORT STORY
ENGL (Select from ENGL courses above) 3
ENGL 4340 SHAKESPEARE

Concentration in Inclusive Practices
Select one of the following options: 12
Option B:
SPED 4230 LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS FOR TEACHERS
SPED 4710 INTERACTIONS AND COLLABORATION
SPED 4800 SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH
SPED 4810 BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS AND SUPPORTS
Total Credits 48
Course List


English Minor
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Requirements
Code Title Credits
ENGL 2410 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE 3
Select 3 additional credits of English at the 2000 level
ENGL 2490 LATINO/A LITERATURE 3
Select 6 credits of English at the 3000 level or higher
ENGL 3100 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE: MAJOR FIGURES
ENGL/WGST 4960 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: SUPERPOWERS (T-American) 6
Select 6 credits of English courses at the 4000 level
ENGL 4060 THE AMERICAN NOVEL
ENGL 4260 WOMEN OF COLOR WRITERS 6
Total Credits 18
Course List


Master of Arts in English
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Degree Requirements
Option 2: Non-Thesis
(36 hours of coursework)
• For this option at least 18 hours of coursework must be seminar-level.
Code Title Credits
Required Courses for both Thesis and Non-Thesis Options
ENGL 8010 SEMINAR: TEXT-BASED RESEARCH METHODS FOR ENGLISH STUDIES 3
ENGL 8030 FIELD-BASED RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH STUDIES 3
Electives
Select 30 hours for the Non-Thesis Option, 18 hours of which must be seminars. Seminars end in a zero (0) (see below). 30
Total Credits 36
Course List
Elective Course List for Both Thesis and Non-Thesis Options
Code Title Credits
ENGL 8246 TEACHING LATINO LITERATURE 3
ENGL 8276 WOMEN WRITERS OF THE WEST 3
ENGL 8410 IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION, AND DIASPORA: CRITICAL APPROACHES AND THEORIES OF MOVEMENT IN LITERATURE 3
ENGL 8610 PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING 3
ENGL 8650
WRITING ACROSS DIFFERENCES: RHETORICAL THEORY FOR PERSUASION AND PUBLIC ADVOCACY 3
ENGL 8740 SEMINAR: DISCOURSE, CULTURE, AND POWER 3
ENGL 8756 COMPOSITION THEORY & PEDAGOGY 3
ENGL 8760/COMM 8200 SEMINAR IN POPULAR CULTURE, MASS MEDIA AND VISUAL RHETORIC 3
ENGL 8780 PEDAGOGIC FIELD EXPERIENCE IN TESOL 3
ENGL 8890 SEMINAR: EXPERIMENTS IN CREATIVE NONFICTION 3
ENGL 8910 SEMINAR: CRITICAL THEORY 3
ENGL 8926 GREAT CHARACTERS 3

Course List
Coursework Outside English
With the approval of the student’s advisor and the English graduate program committee, a student may include a minor or coursework from another related discipline or disciplines as part of the plan of study. For both the thesis and non-thesis options, a minor is 9 hours (3 courses). The maximum amount of coursework that may be applied from another discipline or disciplines is the same as that for a minor in both options (9 hours).

Minor in Latino/Latin American Studies (LLS)
LLS 8145 LATINO/-A POLITICS (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the dynamism and growth of the role of Latinos, as a group of political actors, in the United States. This course provides students with an exposure to and understanding of various concepts and dimensions of this phenomenon, including historical and contemporary Latino political thought and the efforts to increase political empowerment (representation and participation) and influence through grassroots, social, and political movements. (Cross-listed with PSCI 8145, LLS 3140, PSCI 3140)

Everett compiled a canon of materials for introducing students to Latino literature.
LLS 8906 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)
This course is designed for those students who are independently pursuing an area of Latino/Latin American Studies that is not covered under the existing curriculum. The student will be supervised by a member of the faculty of the LLS program. All course assignments, requirements, and expectations will be clearly indicated in advance. May be repeated for credit, up to six hours, under a different topic.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of LLS faculty member required.

This course explored the challenges of Spanish-speaking students in school.
LLS 8916 CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN LLS: SOCIAL SCIENCES (3 credits)
A discussion-led course on current and evolving issues and questions pertaining to the Latino and Latin American immigrant population in the United States and its transnational ties to Latin America and the Caribbean. Topics fall within the social sciences. The course may also include service-learning assignments when appropriate. (Cross-listed with LLS 4910.)
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): A graduate student in good standing and instructor permission.

Exit Requirement
Option 1 Thesis:
• ENGL 8990 Thesis 6 hours
• Comprehensive Examination
Option 2 Non-Thesis:
• Comprehensive Examination


Black Studies Graduate Minor
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
A student is not required by the graduate faculty to have a minor. However, a student may elect a minor with permission of the major department/school and the minor department/school.
The minor must consist of no fewer than nine graduate hours. The courses must be included on the Change in Plan of Study form and the minor department must sign off on this form. The minor will be reflected on the student's transcript at the time of graduation.
Students who elect to complete a minor may be required to take a comprehensive examination over the minor field. This requirement will be at the discretion of the minor advisor. If such an examination is given, it should be given at a date arranged at the convenience of both the student and the minor advisor, but falling within the limits established for all comprehensive examinations.

BLST 8096 BLACK STUDIES ORAL HISTORY (3 credits)
The focus of this course is to examine the method, procedure, transcription and the use of oral history in black studies research. Emphasis will be directed toward describing and evaluating the variables of memory, history and cultural authority, to produce written source materials collected from oral interviews. (Cross-listed with BLST 4090.)

BLST 8580 SEMINAR IN RESEARCH AND WRITINGS OF W.E.B. DUBOIS (3 credits)
This course examines the life and writings of W.E.B. DuBois, who stands as the most eminent intellectual produced by people of African descent in the United States. Perhaps, next to Cheikh Anta Diop, DuBois is the most respected and honored African scholar of the 20th century. Within the context of Western traditions, DuBois is in the top category of prodigious intellectuals developed in the West. He is the father of modern American sociology, the founder of reconstruction history, the leader in urban analysis, the first serious student of inter-racial relations, as well as a novelist, poet, playwright, and essayist.

BLST 8656 SLAVERY AND RACE RELATIONS IN THE AMERICAS (3 credits)
Slavery and Race Relations in the Americas examines the historical relationship between the trans-Atlantic slave trade and American race relations, connecting the enslavement of Africans in the Americas to race relations in the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States. (Cross-listed with BLST 4650, HIST 4070, HIST 8076).
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing


Developing Literacy Expertise Through Responsive Classroom Teaching
from Lesley University online (2008)
Required Core Courses (2)
• Linking Assessment to Teaching: Reading, Writing, and Word Study
Fall 2020
EEDUC 6165.80
• Thinking, Talking, and Writing About Texts
Mar. 16–May 10, 2020
EEDUC 6169.80
Electives (choose 4)
• Intentional Teaching in a Writers' Workshop (K-2 or 3-8)
K–2: Fall 2020
EEDUC 6176.80
3–8: May 11–July 5, 2020
EEDUC 6185.80
• Intentional Teaching in a Readers' Workshop (K–2 or 3–8)
K–2: July 9–August 30, 2020
EEDUC 6180.80
3–8: July 9–August 30, 2020
EEDUC 6168.80
• Guided Reading: Differentiating Literacy Instruction in Grades 3-8
Fall 2020
EEDUC 6045.80
• Word Study: Teaching Phonics, Vocabulary, and Spelling in Grades 3–8
Jan. 21–Mar. 15, 2020
EEDUC 6049.80


Teaching Writing - Graduate Certificate (2010)
through Minnesota State University, Mankato online
This certificate program is designed for current and prospective teachers in middle schools, high schools, and two- and four-year colleges. The aim of the program is to aid teachers in acquiring or expanding their expertise in teaching writing.

Curriculum
Individuals admitted to the certificate program must take three required courses (ten (10) credits) and two elective courses (at least six (6) credits). Courses may be taken in any order. In order to comply with the new HLC guidelines for accreditation, anyone interested in teaching in a content area is required to take eighteen (18) credits of course work. We strongly recommend that our students take eight (8) credits or three elective courses.
The three required courses for the certificate are Advanced Writing Workshop, Composition Theory, and Topics in Teaching Writing. These courses supply theoretical, practical, and experiential knowledge about the teaching of writing. Elective courses allow individuals to pursue particular interests related to the teaching of writing. Below are bulletin descriptions of each course and current course offerings.

Common Core
Please note that ENG 621 and ENG 622 may substitute for ENG 655. ENG 621 and 622 require special permission from the instructor. Both courses are only offered face-to-face.
ENG 555 Advanced Writing Workshop 4
ENG 625 Seminar: Composition Theory 3
ENG 655 Topics in Teaching Writing 3

Restricted Electives
Students may choose from the following course list, taking at least 6 credits.
ENG 584 Pedagogical Grammar and Academic English 4
ENG 649 Topics in Creative Writing: Teaching Creative Writing 3
ENG 656 Teacher Research in the Writing Classroom 3
ENG 657 Teaching Writing with Literature 3


Graduate Academic Certificate in Storytelling
through the University of North Texas online
Life is, truly, the grand narrative. Some theorists believe humans are born with stories living inside us and that we develop language for the purpose of being able to tell those stories. Imagine a group of people sitting around an evening campfire — the atmosphere is rich with mood and tone — and while around that fire, storytelling will naturally emerge. Stories enable children and adults to understand and make meaning in their lives. Storytellers tell tales of life past, present, and future — story is the richest heritage of human civilizations.
Storytelling has emerged from the grande oral tradition into "modern day" platforms represented in books, dance, music, theatre, movies, etc. Story preserves, perpetuates, and transforms culture and is finding new applications in education, corporations, industry, and entertainment — in settings in which people interact or seek to "escape". It is an emerging frontier with compelling possibilities.

Storytelling
"The stories we are willing to share with one another give our culture its values, beliefs, goals, and traditions, binding us together into a cohesive society, allowing us to work together with a common purpose. Storytelling lives at the heart of human experience;" it is "a compelling form of personal communication as ancient as language itself. Since the beginnings of humankind, we have shared through stories the events, beliefs, and values held dear by our families, communities, and cultures."
From The Call of Story
Life is, truly, the grand narrative. Stories are an integral and basic form of communication and information sharing. Before we developed alphabets, we were sharing information and our lives through story. We carved and painted our stories on cave walls. Later, elder storytellers would pass on important history to citizens through story. Story has spread from the grand oral tradition to "modern day" platforms represented in books, dance, music, theatre, movies, etc. The oral storytelling tradition is a powerful method for teaching and learning, management, leadership, information transfer, persuasion, and communication. Story preserves, perpetuates, and transforms culture. This ancient device remains an emerging frontier with compelling possibilities.
The Storytelling GAC is a 100% online program.
The Graduate Academic Certificate program is intended for two audiences:
• Master’s degreed library and information science professionals who want to develop expertise in Storytelling and receive a Graduate Academic Certificate.
• Bachelor's or Master's degreed individuals in any field who want to develop or enhance their knowledge of Storytelling by taking Master's level courses and receiving a Graduate Academic Certificate.
Required Courses for the Storytelling Certificate
• Four courses are required for a total of 12 Hours:
Required Courses:
• INFO 5440 – Storytelling for Information Professionals (3 hours)
o Storytelling ethnography, history, theory, methods, and bibliographic resources. Story research, analysis, selection, adaptation, and preparation. Oral performance development and audience dynamics. Program planning, implementation, evaluation, and grant writing for schools, libraries or other information settings.
• INFO 5441 – Advanced Storytelling for Information Professionals (3 hours)
o Personal storytelling performance development -- psycho-social development; voice and vocal dynamics; movement and gesture; facial expression, posture and performance dress; characterization; dialect and linguistic factors; musical effects; nonverbal behaviors and silence/pause. Training for public storytelling performances in libraries, schools, and community information settings. Advanced program planning, including development, implementation and evaluation of an individual or group storytelling concert. Advanced study of the current trends in storytelling.
• Elective Courses; choose two of the following:
o INFO 5442– Digital Storytelling (3 hours)
o Digital storytelling is a method of combining images, text, music, and the spoken word to create a story presentation that supports teaching, learning, self-expression, marketing, and other communication and community-building objectives. In this course, students will study storytelling tenets and will apply the developmental and technical aspects of creating a digital storytelling presentation. Students will explore theoretical and empirical literature supporting digital storytelling projects and strategies for information seeking and sharing, and they will demonstrate practical approaches for creating digital storytelling projects, for using digital storytelling for classroom projects, and for leading digital storytelling workshops for community-building events.
o INFO 5443– Storytelling Knowledge Transfer (3 hours)
o Storytelling is an inherent form of communicating and of learning. This makes it a powerful tool for knowledge management strategies, particularly that of knowledge transfer. The two overarching learning goals for students of this course are to 1. Construct an approach for using storytelling as a knowledge management (KM) process for sharing/capturing tacit knowledge and 2. Develop best practices for using storytelling to implement a KM program. Students will explore how theoretical and practical tenets of storytelling are used to realize KM goals of creating, capturing, and sharing tacit organizational knowledge. In addition to theoretical research and practical discussion, students will: 1) Develop and perform stories to support key aspects of a knowledge management infrastructure and 2) Apply interviewing and coaching methods to elicit stories from others.

All twelve hours of coursework taken for this Graduate Academic Certificate can also be applied toward the Master’s of Science with majors in Library Science or Information Science program in the University of North Texas' Department of Information Science.


Graduate Certificate in Creative Teaching through Drama
through the Catholic University of America online
Make a dramatic impact on your students! In this 5-course graduate certificate program, develop new approaches for a variety of curriculum topics in K-12 classrooms or other educational settings using Drama as a learning method.
Certificate students take five 3-credit graduate courses offered by the drama department—meeting either in-person on campus, or online.
The entire certificate may be earned completely via online courses.

DR 507: Drama in Education I 3.00 Credits
This course offers an introduction to the philosophy, methodologies, and practice of drama in education. This is a form of learning in which teachers and students engage in lessons that integrate drama and other curriculum subjects to achieve objectives in both. Course readings and written assignments are based on the work of American and British educational drama practitioners. Students in the M.A. Theatre Education (M.A.T.E.) program will complete a lab assignment that requires them to work with young adults or children to practice and reflect on drama in education techniques. All students will learn practical and effective ways to merge drama with curriculum content to increase student learning and engagement.

DR 509: Drama in Education II 3.00 Credits
This course expands on the educational drama work begun in DR507 by exploring additional drama in education techniques. As in DR507, course readings and written assignments are based on the work of American and British educational drama practitioners. Students in the M.A. Theatre Education (M.A.T.E.) program will complete a lab assignment that requires them to work with young adults or children to practice and reflect on drama in education techniques. All students will learn practical and effective ways to merge drama with curriculum content to increase student learning and engagement. NOTE: You do not have to take Part I before Part II.

DR 524: Acting/Directing Workshop 3.00 Credits
The goal of this course is to provide educators who work with young people strategies for helping beginning actors enhance their performance work. Using scenes and monologues, course participants will explore the rehearsal process from both the actor's and director¿s points of view. They will experience exercises and practices intended to increase their effectiveness coaching actors both in the drama classroom and on the stage.

DR 526: Teaching Theatre 3.00 Credits
With its focus on teaching theatre at the elementary, middle, and high school levels, this course will build and increase students' understanding of the curricular and extracurricular aspects of the work of a teacher of theatre. Students will experience, explore, and discuss various teaching strategies and curriculum choices in course content and materials to begin to form personal teaching methodologies. The issues of assessment, classroom management, diversity, and accessibility as aspects of the teaching of theatre form a thread that runs throughout the semester as students examine, create, and share materials for use in future theatre teaching.

DR 528: Educational Theatre: Acting, Directing, and Producing 3.00 Credits
Most theatre teachers are also the directors and producers of their school's plays and musicals. The goal of this course is to provide educators with tools and strategies for the planning, communicating, directing, coaching, coordinating of all the elements of an extracurricular production in K-12 schools. These tools include web sites, forms, and other uses of technology as well as resources for choosing productions, holding auditions, casting, scheduling, communicating and marketing.

DR 624: Theatre of the Oppressed: History and Applications for Theatre in Education 3.00 Credits
This course will examine the history and creation of Augusto Boal's Theater of the Oppressed and its direct applications for secondary theater teachers of acting. Students will study the history and theory of Theatre of the Oppressed, learn and practice acting exercises, and study and act in both forum theater and image theater pieces.

DR 625: Reinventing Shakespeare 3.00 Credits (T-American)
The greatness of Shakespeare is that it speaks to everyone, but it doesn't always say the same thing. This course will explore sequels and prequels, retellings, cross-cultural interpretations, and other examples of reinventing Shakespeare. Students will learn how the plays can be modified to make them relevant to different audiences, how to stage variations on a play, and how to make lesson plans for children to reimagine Shakespeare in their own ways.


Burton "Burr" Alexander -- He has pale skin, dark blue eyes, and short gray hair. He needs glasses. Sensitive to cold, he often wears a sweater and a turtleneck under his suit jacket. His students often call him Professor Burr. He grew up in Omaha, Nebraska.
Burr earned a Bachelor of Science in Education - Secondary Education with a Specialty in Inclusive Practices and a Psychology minor at the University of Nebraska-Omaha. He went on to get a Master of Science in Educational Leadership and an Instruction in Urban Schools Certificate at the same school, followed by a Doctor of Education in Educational Administration with a Communication Certificate.
After working at various schools, Burr pioneered Nebraska's prison-to-college program. In 2005, he started by introducing college-level classes at the Nebraska Penitentiary. Then in 2007 he lobbied colleges to accept those credits. In 2009, he made arrangements with the Nebraska Community College Association to accept diligent students after their release, followed in 2011 by the University of Nebraska system. In 2013 he talked both systems into allowing inmates to complete online degrees using courses offered by the NCC or UoN systems along with prison ones. Finally in 2015 Burr convinced the colleges to provide free tuition and guaranteed enrollment to former inmates with grades and points above a certain level, as a reward for good behavior. This has cut recidivism in half by raising the chance of gainful employment after release. Others enrolled in college just to have a structured environment, which also helped.
Qualities: Master (+6) Prison Education Teacher, Expert (+4) Bookworm, Expert (+4) Linguistic Intelligence, Good (+2) Influential, Good (+2) Kindness, Good (+2) Stamina
Poor (-2) Sensitive to Cold

Education - Secondary Education, Bachelor of Science
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Requirements
A candidate for a degree and/or teaching endorsement in grades 6-12 or 7-12 must complete the following course requirements:
Code Title Credits
TED 3550
SECONDARY CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 3
TED 3690
LITERACY AND LEARNING 3
TED 4000
SPECIAL METHODS IN THE CONTENT AREA 3
TED 4600
CLINICAL PRACTICE AND SEMINAR: ELEMENTARY OR SECONDARY LEVEL 12
Total Credits 21
Course List
Courses Required for Major (Core Curriculum)
Code Title Credits
Professional Education Sequence
TED 2100 EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS 3
TED 2200 HUMAN RELATIONS FOR BIAS-FREE CLASSROOMS 3
TED 2400 PLANNING FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING 6
TED 2380 DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING IN ADOLESCENCE 3
Total Credits 15
Course List
A candidate for a degree and/or teaching endorsement in grades K-12 must complete the following course requirements:
Code Title Credits
SPED 3800 DIFFERENTIATION AND INCLUSIVE PRACTICES 3
TED 4640K-12 CLINICAL PRACTICE AND SEMINAR ELEMENTARY/SECONDARY 12
TED 4650 CLINICAL PRACTICE AND SEMINAR: ELEMENTARY OR SECONDARY LEVEL 1 6
Methods within their content area
Total Credits 21


Inclusive Practices
Code Title Credits
ENGL 4750 COMPOSITION THEORY & PEDAGOGY 3
ENGL 4860 MODERN FAMILIAR ESSAY 3
TED 3750 TEACHING GRAMMAR IN CONTEXT 3
TED 4590 TEACHING AND LEARNING IN DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS 3
TED 4660 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 3
Select one of the following: 3
ENGL 2310 INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH LITERATURE I
Select one of the following: 3
ENGL 3100 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE: MAJOR FIGURES
Select one of the following electives: 3
ENGL/BLST 2260 BLACK SHORT STORY
ENGL (Select from ENGL courses above) 3
ENGL 4340 SHAKESPEARE

Concentration in Inclusive Practices
Select one of the following options: 12
Option A:
SPED 3020 DATA COLLECTION TECHNIQUE: ROLE IN TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS
SPED 4640 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
SPED 4810 BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS AND SUPPORTS
SPED 4000 PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
Total Credits 48


Psychology Minor
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Requirements
An undergraduate minor in psychology may be earned by completing the following:
Code Title Credits
PSYC 1010
INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I 3
Select 12 hours of upper division (3000 or 4000 level) Psychology courses. 12
Total Credits 15
Course List
A grade of “C-” or better must be earned in all courses submitted for a minor in Psychology.

PSYC 3430 PERSONALITY AND ADJUSTMENT (3 credits)
The study of persons in a social context and their resultant effective and ineffective behavior, with emphasis on types of adjustment.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3510 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)
A study of the capacities and interests of children and their individual differences. Factors that influence learning and an evaluation of learning and classroom procedures are included.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3540 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)
A review of theory and available evidence useful in understanding changes and problems in the physical, intellectual, social and emotional adjustment of individuals in adolescence.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 4230 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (3 credits)
A comprehensive study of the relationship of the nervous and other organ systems to behavior. Research on both human and other animal species is considered.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 4250 LIMITS OF CONSCIOUSNESS (3 credits)
A course focusing on the scientific study of the psychology, neurology and philosophy of mind. This course is designed for students who are interested in thinking about thinking. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8256, PHIL 3250)
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010; or 6 hours in Philosophy.

PSYC 4440 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)
A course designed to examine the aberrant behavior of individuals. Symptoms, dynamics, therapy and prognosis of syndromes are considered. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8446)
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.


Educational Leadership, MS
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Degree Requirements
Code Title Credits
Required Courses
TED 8010 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 3
EDL 8030 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 3
EDL 8050 SCHOOL-COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS 3
EDL 8020 EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND LEADERSHIP 1
EDL 8490 INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP 3
EDL 8740 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR SCHOOL LEADERSHIP 1
EDL 8710 INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 3
EDL 8730 COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE IN EDUCATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCES 1
EDL 8780 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP SUMMIT 2
EDL 8750 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN EDUCATION 1
Concentration
Select one of the following concentrations: 12
Teacher Leader Concentration
Electives
Select 3 hours of electives from the following in consultation with your advisor: 3
EDL 8800 SCHOOL LEADERSHIP ACADEMY

Total Credits 36
Course List
Exit Requirements
Comprehensive Examination

EDL 8000 SPECIAL STUDIES IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (3 credits)
This course will provide candidates in educational leadership with the opportunities and experiences of in-depth study of a specialized area of practice and research in school leadership.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Studies or permission of instructor.

EDL 8810 URBAN SCHOOL LEADERSHIP (3 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint candidates with urban concerns and issues which most significantly affect the administration of schools in and around metropolitan areas.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to Graduate College.

EDL 9520 ACHIEVING SCHOOL EXCELLENCE (3 credits)
An advanced seminar on the pursuit of improvement in education and the role of administration in guiding positive school change through influence, persuasion, power, ethics, and research.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to the University of Nebraska Joint Doctoral Degree program or admission to another University of Nebraska doctoral program. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

EDL 8730 COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE IN EDUCATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCES (1 credit)
This course focuses upon the interpersonal and professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions of human resources issues and functions for effective leadership in education.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to Graduate College.
EDL 8740 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR SCHOOL LEADERSHIP (1 credit)
This course addresses strategies and models of planning, implementing, and evaluating adult and organizational learning for effective leadership in education.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admittance to Graduate College. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

EDL 8720 MULTICULTURAL AND NON-SEXIST AWARENESS (1 credit)
This course is designed for certificated educational employees, both teachers and administrators, seeking renewal of Nebraska certification under Nebraska LB 250 (Multi-Cultural and Interpersonal Relations).This course meets the requirements of Nebraska law LB 250 (Multi-Cultural and Interpersonal Relations). The purpose of the course is to develop awareness of cultural diversity in American society and to develop skills to effectively meet the needs of students, parents, and school community members.
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate level. Permit of department required.


Instruction in Urban Schools Certificate
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Degree Requirements
Code Title Credits
Required Courses
Choose 6 courses from the list below. 18
TED 8130 LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND POWER
TED 8150 ANTI-RACISM EDUCATION: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
TED 8180 CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE TEACHING
TED 8210 THE PRINCIPLES OF MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
TED 8800 MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH
TED 9200 CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: TEACHING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE
Total Credits 18


Educational Administration, EdD
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Degree Requirements
Code Title Credits
The program requires a total of 96 hours of coursework.
At least 45 hours of new coursework must be completed after admission to the doctoral program.
Required Seminar Courses
EDL 9510
SEMINAR IN CULTURE AND CONTEXT OF SCHOOLING 3
EDL 9520
ACHIEVING SCHOOL EXCELLENCE 3
EDL 9530
PARADIGMS AND PRACTICES OF SCHOOLING 3
Required Research Tools/Methods
EDL 9630 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH 3
Select one of the following: 3
EDL 9650 PROGRAM EVALUATION FOR EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATORS
Electives 12
EDL 8560 SCHOOL FINANCE
EDL 8620 SCHOOL PLANTS AND EQUIPMENT
EDL 9310 ISSUES IN STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR SCHOOL LEADERS
EDL 9320 LEGAL ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
Exit Requirement
EDL 9990 DISSERTATION 12
Total Credits 45
Exit Requirements
• Comprehensive Examination
• Dissertation EDL 9990


(A doctorate certificate in T-America requires 8 classes (24 credits) plus the publication of an academic paper. He wrote a paper on "Communicating with Disenfranchised Students.")
Communication Graduate Certificate
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha
Total Number of Hours for Certificate Curriculum:18
The assumption is that the certificate courses are a subset of an existing master’s degree curriculum. Please attach a brief explanation if this is not the case.
Response: For this certificate, any of the 8000/9000 level courses taught within the School of Communication are available for Communication Graduate Certificate students to take as part of their 18 credit hours. As this program is meant for the student to create her/his/their own customized curriculum within the School’s offerings, the only restrictions on courses are the methods courses taught for the MA program students, denoted with * (those courses designated for MA students only; Certificate students who are interested taking a core course may be allowed by permit with instructor permission).
For those students focusing on HLC accreditation (to teach at the Associate’s level or the dual-enrollment level), certain courses will be denoted as “suggested” within promotional materials as they align with those courses being taught at that particular level.
Please complete the below course list.
As the program details, any six (or 18 credit hours) of coursework from the following can be utilized, through advising with the Graduate Program Chair, to complete the program. Other courses not listed but in the catalog (e.g., core courses) might be used with the approval of the GPC and the course instructor.
CMST 8126 COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL PROTEST 3
CMST 8146 COMMUNICATION AND HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS 3
CMST 8166 COMMUNICATION FOR INSTRUCTIONAL SETTINGS 3
CMST 8186 COMMUNICATION LEADERSHIP AND POWER AND ORGANIZATIONS 3
CMST 8516 PERSUASION AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE 3
CMST 8556 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION 3
CMST 8566 COMMUNICATION, TEAMWORK, & FACILITATION 3
CMST 8806 CONFLICT MEDIATION 3

* * *

“… the truest writers are those who see language not as a linguistic process but as a living element….”
Derek Walcott (St. Lucian poet and playwright).

Prison education is essential for many reasons. A good program can lower recidivism by a third to half.

Prison demographics show extreme racism, worse in local-America but still present in Terramagne-America. Here it's so bad that you can locate prisons just by looking at a racial dotmap. This is a modern form of slavery, since free people of color are valued less than imprisoned ones.

Black and Hispanic authors are necessary to the success of students of color. Browse reading lists of black books for adults, black books for children, Chicano books for adults, and Hispanic books for children.

Teachers of color are vitally important but scarce, and they tend to quit for cause. This is a problem because black students need black teachers and Hispanic students need Hispanic teachers in order to thrive.

Tokenism holds up successful individuals to hide the oppression of others, which causes many problems in schools and elsewhere. Here are some ways to reduce this tendency at work. The two best ways to avoid tokenism: 1) aim for at least two of each group to minimize isolation, and 2) put diverse people in positions of authority. A good check is to compare your organization's demographics with those of its target audience and/or the local population. The closer the match, the better you're doing.

Most prison inmates are functionally illiterate, and many are completely illiterate. Those who can read rarely do so beyond third grade level. These shortcomings follow racial lines, showing that people of color suffer educational neglect that funnels them into prison.

Making choices is an essential life skill. Criminals often suffer impaired decision-making, for reasons that actually make sense when you consider how terrible their options are. Like all skills, making decisions takes practice. This extensive article explains decision-making and how to learn it. Know how to teach decision-making and work through age-appropriate stages. Readers need to understand how to choose books suited to their reading level. (Nutshell: if you know everything in it and you're bored, it's too easy; if you struggle to make sense of things, it's too hard; ideally, a book should be comfortable to read but challenge you to stretch a little.) Macmillan offers a reading level test.
Tags: cyberfunded creativity, education, fantasy, fishbowl, poem, poetry, reading, weblit, writing
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