Elizabeth Barrette (ysabetwordsmith) wrote,
Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith

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Notes for "Protect the Forests"

These are the notes for "Protect the Forests."


"We must protect the forests for our children, grandchildren and children yet to be born. We must protect the forests for those who can’t speak for themselves such as the birds, animals, fish and trees."
Qwatsinas

In Terramagne-Rocky Boy's Reservation, the Box Corral lies just outside of Box Elder. Azure Corral stands just outside of Azure.  The Evergreen Corral is part of the Rocky Boy Recreation Area near Mt. Baldy.  These are the tribe's three communal corrals for horse work.

The history of Native American horses is disputed.  While conventional history claims there were no horses prior to the European invasions, tribal histories indicate otherwise.  (Apparently nobody could be arsed to do enough genetic research to identify whether the tribal horses have any genetic differences from European stock.)  Atavistic and exotic markings lend support to this premise.

Certain markings are prized in Native American horses. Blue eyes, sometimes called Spirit Eyes, allow the horse to see mystical things and spot danger in time to evade it. The Medicine Hat is a dark spot over the ears and top of the head. It conveys wisdom and protection. The Medicine Shield is a dark, roundish spot on the chest. It grants courage and protection in battle. The Breechclout is a dark spot covering the tail and base of the tail. It protects against betrayal and attacks from behind. (I couldn't find a reference for this one, but it's something I recall from otherlife experience.) Each of these spots must be unconnected to any other dark areas. None are particularly common, but they are all related within the same genetic complex, so sometimes two appear together -- most often the Medicine Hat with either the Medicine Shield or Spirit Eyes. Three is a scarce combination and all four is vanishingly rare.

Native American tack has varied widely over time and from one tribe to another.  It ranges from almost nothing on up to elaborate beaded barding for ceremonies.  Often it's just a war bridle and a bareback pad.  Their principles of capturing, mounting, and otherwise working with horses are quite different from European models.  The "lean over" method shown with Kenzie has been used across various tribes, and is likely the oldest approach.

Montana has about 22.5 million acres of forest, or about one-fourth of its 94,109,542 acres.  West of the Continental Divide, Ponderosa pine dominates along with limber pine and juniper.

Montana forest management qualifies for assistance across tribal, state, and private forests.  This index page offers information about alternative forest management, windbreaks, fire hazard reduction, best practices, and so on.  T-Rocky Boy's uses primarily traditional methods augumented by modern knowledge, including removal of flammable materials and controlled burning.

First Nations have more independence on average in Terramagne-America than in local-America, which means their tribal forests have less government interference and more freedom of local management. They can use traditional wisdom to inform their choices. This is complicated for tribes that were forcibly removed from their homelands and dumped into the least desirable areas. Rocky Boy's Reservation has a rare advantage in that its founders were guided by a vision, giving them a better connection to their new home. The Chippewa-Cree are currently engaged in building a set of traditions suited to this locale. Thus far they have determined that their forest is happy to support multiple uses (hunting, fishing, arts and crafts, firewood, lumber, hiking, rituals, etc.) and it likes horse logging but not heavy equipment.

Sustainable forestry often includes horse logging due to its advantages over heavy machinery.

Forests can be managed for many different purposes and products.

Wood heating is effective and sustainable.  Learn how to manage a forest for firewood.  Pay attention to timing when harvesting firewood.

A forest can produce many non-timber products including tree and shrub seeds, boughs and bark, cedar and willow, mushrooms, craft supplies, and loose parts for children's play.

Coppicing is a traditional forestry practice that creates multiple new shoots from a single stump. It is ideal for producing both firewood and craft supplies.  Certain species are among the most popular for this use.

Food forests come in different types and have many benefits.  Learn how to create a food forest from an existing woodland or from scratch.  A huge advantage for reservation use is that to most white people, it doesn't look like anything special, which means they're less motivated to steal or destroy it.

Managing forests for fish and wildlife requires careful attention to the environment and habitat diversity.  Consider wildlife needs in taking steps to attract them.  Plant food plots in different places.

Native Americans have a long history with horses, regarding them variously as relatives and sacred beings.  This influences training methods, as in this Blackfoot example.

Certain markings are prized in Native American horses. Blue eyes, sometimes called Spirit Eyes, allow the horse to see mystical things and spot danger in time to evade it. The Medicine Hat is a dark spot over the ears and top of the head. It conveys wisdom and protection. The Medicine Shield is a dark, roundish spot on the chest. It grants courage and protection in battle. The Breechclout is a dark spot covering the tail and base of the tail. It protects against betrayal and attacks from behind. (I couldn't find a reference for this one, but it's something I recall from otherlife experience.) Each of these spots must be unconnected to any other dark areas. None are particularly common, but they are all related within the same genetic complex, so sometimes two appear together -- most often the Medicine Hat with either the Medicine Shield or Spirit Eyes. Three is a scarce combination and all four is vanishingly rare.

Natural horsemanship is a broad family of approaches to gentling rather than breaking horses.  Native American horsemanship relies on creating affinity through techniques like walking a horse down and typically uses light or no tack.

Read about Rocky Boy's vision.

A travois is a type of sled for pulling cargo overland, widely used by tribal people with horses or dogs, although people can pull it too.  Different styles exist.

Horse body language includes many aspects that you can learn to understand. This chart describes multiple body parts and their meanings. Body poses, ear outlines and ear photos, muzzle, and tail all communicate. The "airplane" position of ears drooping sideways indicates extreme relaxation in this case.

Grooming should be enjoyable for the horse, and some of them are real brush sluts.  This promotes bonding, as herdmates routinely groom each other and the concept readily extends to humans.  Follow the steps for grooming a horse.

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