Elizabeth Barrette (ysabetwordsmith) wrote,
Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith

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Location notes for "Watching The Water Department"

These are the location notes for "Watching The Water Department."


Reflétant l’école -- an alternative school designed to support children's urge to mimic adults. Classes include no more than 12 students per teacher. In a school building, this often means having a class of 20-30 students with 2-3 teachers, such that one can monitor the general activity while another(s) gives a lesson to a small group. However, this is one of the best alternative methods in terms of adapting to tutoring or homeschooling. One teacher may then guide a handful of students, even if they have different ages and abilities. This approach is popular both with upper-class families who hire a tutor, governess, or nanny; and with middle-class families who homeschool their children. Reflétant l’école was developed by a French-speaking community in Vermont who wanted an effective system of education that scaled well across socioeconomic classes, and it represents a formal version of historic practices. It is customarily a French immersion school for that reason, although it doesn't have to be. The name literally means "reflecting school," although it is often rendered in English as "reflection school" or even "mirror school." The densest concentration of schools is in the northeast (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Massachusetts) followed by Louisiana. There's another sizable cluster in Michigan, some in Missouri mostly River City, a couple in Onion City, and others scattered widely around including one in Healy, Denali, Alaska.

The school style has a profound effect on people. It's the only known school in which all students are shown how to teach as well as how to learn. About 25% of students choose a career in education or some related field. Another 15% go into art, photography, home decoration, or other visual arts. About 10% choose dance, modeling, entertainment, or some other career that involves being looked at. Another 5% go into a career that uses French such as French teacher, writer, singer, diplomat, or fashion designer. And yet the body image among students is overwhelmingly higher than average: they grow up surrounded by images of themselves and other people, so they see more honestly and accept more accurately.

reflétant l’école
reflecting school

Word-by-word list
reflecting:
réfléchissant
school:
école, banc, cours...

école de miroir
mirror school

mirror
verb [ transitive ] /ˈmɪrər/
to be the same as
refléter
views that mirrored her own ideas
des opinions qui reflétent ses propres idées

to reflect as a mirror does
refléter
The smooth surface of the lake mirrored the surrounding mountains.

There are multiple systems of French capitalization. Pick one and stick with it. I use the sentence approach.

Reflétant l’école Cécile de Brunhoff has a room dedicated to each of five age groups: infant, toddler, grade school, junior high, high school.

A playground in the yard provides active space for children.

The basement includes locker rooms with lockers, showers, sinks, and toilets. There are also two dotties, each with a toilet, roll-under sink, and roll-in shower with seat.

The school has a dance studio where they teach ballet, ballroom dance, and French folk dances. Mirrors line one or more walls. The dance studio is distinguished from a regular classroom by the barres that run along the walls. This also supports students with special needs who require balance aids or physical therapy, making the school very inclusive. The main goal is simply to provide exercise and teach dancing to a social level of skill. However, students who show real talent have the opportunity to specialize in it without going to a dance school that may underserve academic studies.
The same studio serves for other activities such as yoga, meditation, and calisthenics. This school does not teach conventional sports such as basketball or football, so their physical education setup is very different.

The Teen Room has tables for studying. The arts and crafts corner includes multiple work stations and supplies for drawing, painting, jewelrymaking, circuit building, and various other activities. This bookcase holds various games. A piano stands in one corner.

The Tween Room has tables and chairs along with blackboards.

In art class, students make self-portraits by using mirrors. Later they take turns modeling for each other.

The Library lies under the Child Room and has built-in shelves full of books. It has its own bathroom with a sink, toilet, and bathtub with shower.

Just inside the front door is a wall quote that reads, "La famille c'est là où la vie commence & où l'amour ne finit jamais." ("The family is where life begins and love never ends.") The Music Room includes a windowseat.

All students are taught the basics of self-care, family care, and other life skills. Those interested in more challenge can take advanced classes such as romance, parenting, child development, kitchen science, or costume design. The available curriculum goes up to the level of a finishing school, offering much more advanced instruction in topics that most schools abandon at trivial levels. That's one reason they turn out so many professionals in certain careers: their students get a big head start. The kitchen on the main floor hosts most of the home economics, while a majority of staff cooking for the students happens in the upstairs kitchen.

This picture is taken from the bay window in the dining room. The other arch in the kitchen leads to the living room.

The Child Room is stocked for elementary ages.

The left front door leads to a foyer with a laundry sink, two washer-dryer sets, coatracks, and assorted storage. Immediately to the right of the front door is the doorway to the rest of the main floor. At the back of the laundry room, to the right is the door to the accessible dottie with a toilet, roll-under sink, and roll-in shower.

The residential elevator has been installed in what used to be a storage closet, thus maintaining the period features of the old building. The staircase is lined with mirrors.

The second floor kitchen includes a refrigerator, stove, sink, and island. The quote above the snack table reads, "N'arrêtez jamais de rêver." ("Never stop dreaming.")

The common bathroom has a toilet and sink. The bathtub is not visible from this angle.

The Toddler Room includes a nose wiping station, handwashing station, and bathroom with a low toilet and sink.

The Infant Room includes mirrored pebbles, a hair brushing station, and a messy play station.

The left end of the house has a sleeping porch.

This hallway leads to the attic playroom. In December they have a Christmas tree. Here you can see a long view of the attic playroom. The far end features a storage wall. As you can see in this closeup, the low cabinets make it easy for children to reach things themselves. Some of the books and games are in English for translation practice, while others are in French. Children enjoy playing on the wood floor. These French blocks have numbers, letters, pictures, and words. The left side of the room has a table and chairs with art supplies. Butterflies cling to the sloped ceiling. The dress-up corner includes a mirror and several baskets of clothes. This is a framed recipe that one of the children drew. The near wall has a viewscreen with a couch. A play tent sits just inside the door. Children's artwork hangs beside the play tent.

The Nap Room has floor beds and mirrors. It includes a table with children's books in French for naptime stories. Often the older children read aloud to the younger ones.

The school also hosts field trips from time to time.

The school style has a profound effect on people. It's the only known school in which all students are shown how to teach as well as how to learn. About 25% of students choose a career in education or some related field. Another 15% go into art, photography, home decoration, or other visual arts. About 10% choose dance, modeling, entertainment, or some other career that involves being looked at. Another 5% go into a career that uses French such as French teacher, writer, singer, diplomat, or fashion designer. And yet the body image among students is overwhelmingly higher than average: they grow up surrounded by images of themselves and other people, so they see more honestly and accept more accurately.
Tags: cyberfunded creativity, education, ethnic studies, family skills, fantasy, fishbowl, poetry, reading, weblit, writing
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