Elizabeth Barrette (ysabetwordsmith) wrote,
Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith

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How to Make New Year's Resolutions

Many people make New Year's resolutions at this time. (You can also do it whenever your calendar begins, if you follow a different one.) They have their ups and downs.


Here are some ideas for resolutions:

https://www.goskills.com/Soft-Skills/Articles/Top-10-new-years-resolutions

https://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/50-new-years-resolution-ideas-and-how-achieve-each-them.html

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/wellness/advice/g985/achievable-new-year-resolutions/

https://www.elitedaily.com/p/10-new-years-resolutions-for-couples-to-make-together-that-youll-actually-want-to-keep-7548015

https://www.parents.com/holiday/new-years/resolution/smart-new-years-resolutions-kids-can-make/

http://ageofmontessori.org/my-top-ten-new-years-resolutions-for-parents/

https://medfordleas.org/blog/20-fun-new-years-resolutions-seniors/

https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2015-12-28/employers-commit-to-making-these-8-new-years-resolutions

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/17-new-years-career-resolutions-youll-be-able-to-keep

https://www.bustle.com/articles/132632-5-new-years-resolutions-that-help-other-people-and-make-the-world-a-better-place

https://www.earthday.org/12-new-years-resolutions-for-the-planet-in-2020/


The failure rate for New Year's resolutions is very high. There are many reasons why.

One big reason for failure is not knowing yourself well enough to understand what works for you and what doesn't, including what kind of goal setter you are. You must learn this first or you will struggle to achieve anything else. I have found that broad resolutions don't work well for me, and neither does a single resolution or short list. Keeping an updatable list lets me track progress and find things to work on. Smaller targets help. This is one of the extremely rare times when I love using numbers. "Do more X" is vague. "Do X 3 times" or "Do X once a month" is clear. Multiple targets work great. In this regard I approach year-end goals with all the enthusiasm of a Klingon warrior firing into an enemy fleet. DoSmey! Qapla'!

Some people like setting a theme. It's a good way to organized a cluster of related goals. It also works great if you make resolutions with family, friends, and/or coworkers because then you can support each other, which increases success. For instance, if the theme is Words then one person might resolve to read a new book every (timeframe), another might pursue nonviolent communication, and a third volunteer to teach literacy. You can even use this to maintain ties over long distance, if you talk about your challenges and accomplishments.

https://modernparentsmessykids.com/top-10-new-years-resolutions-to-make-with-your-family/

https://www.bustle.com/p/12-new-years-resolutions-you-your-bestie-can-make-together-7674470

https://www.careeraddict.com/new-year-resolutions

If you get bored easily, you might want to make a resolution that changes regularly, typically each week or each month. Instead of pursuing one virtue all year, consider a tour featuring different virtues. Even if you suck at one, that's okay, you'll get a new one next week or month. Keep track of your highs and lows; next year, you might want to spend more time on either your best or worst areas. This concept works with many types of list, such as social skills, hobbies, or random acts of kindness.

Another big reason for failure is not knowing how to set and pursue goals. If your resolution is vague, you're less likely to meet it or understand that you have indeed done so. SMART goals are great, though not suitable for all purposes. Some people like HARD goals. Ideally, choose a mix of easy, medium, and hard goals; short, medium, and long term goals. I find that setting a goal to look at my goal list periodically increases my tendency to do so, and it's among the easier ones to meet as are goals to keep up with my regular projects. New or unusual things are harder. Here are some other thoughts on goals.

https://liveboldandbloom.com/05/habits/types-of-goals

https://jamesclear.com/goal-setting

https://positivepsychology.com/goal-setting/

https://medium.com/swlh/5-proven-ways-to-set-goals-and-achieve-them-cf19016b3af1

https://www.fastcompany.com/3029765/how-to-set-goals-for-the-life-you-actually-want

https://www.developgoodhabits.com/goal-setting-worksheet/

https://worksheetplace.com/index.php?function=DisplayCategory&links=2&id=279&link1=31&link2=279

https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Free-Printable-Goal-Sheets-44467993

https://www.erincondren.com/inspiration-center-goals-for-2020

https://www.blog.daydesigner.com/turn-goals-into-monthly-actions-weekly-routines-and-daily-habits/

https://www.loveourreallife.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Goals-for-week-2-768x959.png

https://www.loveourreallife.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Monthly-goals-768x957.png

https://www.loveourreallife.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Goals-per-quarter-768x980.png

https://www.loveourreallife.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Goals-Yearly-2-768x973.png


If you want to succeed, do science to it! Here are some other tips on how to meet your New Year's resolutions:

https://theconversation.com/7-science-based-strategies-to-boost-your-willpower-and-succeed-with-your-new-years-resolutions-128762

https://blog.iqmatrix.com/new-years-resolutions

https://www.realmenrealstyle.com/successful-new-year-resolutions/

https://psychcentral.com/lib/10-sure-ways-to-keep-your-new-years-resolutions/

https://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/10-reasons-why-new-years-resolutions-fail.html


Compensatory joys make hard things easier. Reward yourself for reaching goals. Ideally, tie the reward to the goal. If you meet a fitness goal, you might buy yourself a workout clothing capsule. If you meet a food goal, get a new cookbook or a cool kitchen gadget that supports your project.

Explore ways to reward yourself for hard work and effort, even if you fail. Recently I reviewed Call to Adventure, a game that involves attempting Challenges. If you succeed, you add the Challenge card to your character; if you fail, you gain an Experience Point (and sometimes get to draw a Hero or Antihero card) which helps you do more later. For best motivation, keep the effort rewards smaller than the accomplishment rewards.

Failure is a natural and necessary part of life. Know how to handle it. Practice managed risk and look for ways to make safe mistakes. Remember, if you're not making any mistakes, you're not learning, you're coasting!
Tags: family skills, holiday, how to, life lessons
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