Elizabeth Barrette (ysabetwordsmith) wrote,
Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith

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Location and content notes for "The Mark of Your Ignorance"

These are the location and content notes for "The Mark of Your Ignorance."


See the rental cottages in Easy City; Valor's Widow has the white one, #9. Here is the floor plan. The living room has two linen chairs, a matching couch (not visible in this picture), and an old trunk used as a coffee table. The dining room holds a wooden table, two chairs, and two benches plus a china cabinet. The cottage comes stocked with tableware for eight. The kitchen has white cabinetry with a rustic sink. The bathroom is decorated in pale blue and tan. The master bedroom has a full-size bed with an antique ironwork frame facing two corner windows. The office-bedroom contains a wooden desk and rolling chair, a white easy chair, and a white loveseat that folds out into a twin bed.

The Mechanical Mammoth Site
MLS# 5244001 - $599,376
2061 Deer Creek Road NE - Longville MN 56655 - Land - 499.48 Acres
Property Uses: Buildable Land, Heavily Wooded Land, Large Acreage, Wooded Land

The Leech Lake Indian Reservation (Ojibwe: Gaa-zagaskwaajimekaag) is home to the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe in north-central Minnesota.

Longville, Minnesota had a population of 156 at the 2010 census, but booms in the summer due to tourism.

Mammoth Woods lies south of Wabedo Lake and County Road 47 NE. The front of the house has a wrought iron porch. The back of the house has a deck. The house uses the 3-bedroom floor plan, except that the master bedroom has an extension built for a nursery or sitting room, with a back door opening onto the deck. The barn holds the mechanical mammoth and other large equipment. The shed provides storage for firewood and other supplies, and it has skinning hooks overhead for cleaning game and other tasks.

The garden lies fallow in in late fall. A cleared lane leads to the nearest meadow. A pine savanna has trees scattered amongst the grass. A birch grove shows white bark amidst darker trees. A cleared lane follows a ridge. Downed trees line the path. Pine trees flank the lane. This observation stand provides shelter while studying wildlife. This cleared lane leads to Tusker Lake. A little rise of land beside a creek has a place to camp. The post holds an electric hookup. The willow marsh borders Tusker Lake and weaves into the edges of the forest. Tusker Lake curls into an arc, like the tusk of a mammoth. Mammoth woods supports many birds.

I couldn't find an actual mechanical mammoth, but I found some other references to give you an idea of its style.

This is a super-gizmotronic elephant:
Big Five Part 3: African Elephant
With heavy armor, incredible strength, and great size the Elephant is employed in the field as a walking fortress for the patrols. Each unit is accompanied by 3 - 4 rangers. Depending on the situation the unit can be deployed as a solitary Bull Elephant or a Matriach which accompanies the herds. Matriachs are unmanned and lack the features to support human companions due to the close proximity to the herds.
Typical roles of a Bull model featured here include supply/troop transport, mobile communications, heavy recon, night patrol platform, heavy lifting/obstacle clearing, and heavy support roles in combat
.
See the plan.

This is a steampunk elephant.

* * *

Loyola University Academic Calendar Summer 2014
8-week Session
May 26 M University Holiday
27 T Classes Begin and Registration Continues
28 W Last Day for Registration and Drop/Add
Last Day to Change to Audit (Student Records Office)
Last Day for 100% refund

July 4 W University Holiday
7 Th Last Day to Withdraw
15 T Final Examinations for Tuesday Classes
17 Th Final Examinations for Thursday Classes
21 M Final Examinations for Monday Classes
23 W Final Examinations for Wednesday Classes
28 M Final Grades must be posted by Midnight

Loyola University Academic Calendar Fall 2014
August
W-Sun 13-17 Wolf Pack Welcome Orientation Fall Program
M 18 Classes Begin
M-F 18-22 Registration and Drop/Add Continues
F 22 Last Day to Add
Last Day to be Admitted and Registered
Last Day to Change to Full-Time Status or to Audit
F 29 Last Day to Drop

October
M-T 6-7 Fall Break Holidays**
F 10 Mid-Term Deadline for posting Grades Midnight
F 17 Last Day to Apply for Graduation in May, August and December 2019
Last Day to Request a Change of Major or Minor Prior to Registration
M 20 Spring and Summer 2019 Registration Advising Begins
F 24 Last Day to Withdraw

November
M 3 Spring and Summer 2019 Registration Begins
M-F 10-14 Loyola Week (All Classes Continue)
Th 13 President's Missioning Mass and Inauguration: 11:00 Classes Cancelled
W-F 26-28Thanksgiving Holidays

December
M 1 Classes Resume
F 5 Last Day of Classes
Registration Closes for Undergrad Day Students at Midnight
Sat-Sun 6-7 Study Days
Mon-Fri 8-12 Final Examinations
Sun 14 Deadline for posting Undergrad and Grad Students Grades Sunday at Midnight
** May be used as replacement days for instruction days lost due to Hurricanes

Loyola University Academic Calendar Spring 2015
January
M 5 New Students Arrive
Registration Reopens for All Students
T 6 Orientation for New Undergraduate Students
W 7 Classes Begin
M-F 12-16 Registration/Drop-Add Continues
F 16 Last Day to be Admitted & Registered
Last Day to Add
Last Day to Change to Full-Time Status or to Audit
W 21 Martin Luther King Jr's Birthday Holiday
F 23 Last Day to Drop

February
M-F 16-20 Mardi Gras Holidays
M 23 Classes Resume

March
W 4 Mid-Term Deadline for posting Grades Midnight
F 20 Last Day to Withdraw
M 23 Fall 2019 Registration Advising Begins
M-M 30-April 6 Easter Holidays

April
T 7 Classes Resume
Th 9 Fall 2019 Registration Begins

May
W 6 Last Day of Classes for Undergraduate Day Courses
Th 7 Study Day/ Day Division: No Examinations May Be Given Except as per Final Exam Schedule
Last Day of Classes for Graduate and Evening Courses
F-Th 8-14 Day Division Final Examinations
M-Th 11-14 Final Examinations for Graduate and Evening Courses
F 15 University Baccalaureate Mass
Sat 16 Commencement - Undergraduate and Graduate Students
M 18 Deadline for posting Undergraduate and Graduate Students Grades Midnight


Traditional Undergraduate students are charged a flat rate for tuition if they are enrolled as full-time students having registered for 12 to 21 credit hours. Students taking less than 12 hours are charged on a per-hour basis. Undergraduate adult students enrolled through Loyola's Adult Learning program are charged the flat full-time rate for 13 to 21 credit hours and the per-hour rate for less than 13 credit hours. Students taking more than 21 hours are charged the flat rate, plus the per-hour rate for the hours over 21. This overload rate applies to music, theatre and honors students taking over 23 hours. There is no full-time or flat rate during the summer session.

Note that the local-American definition of bioethics often, though not always, focuses narrowly on medical bioethics. Terramagne-America considers more widely the ways in which vital decisions can impact quality of life, survival, and also other living things beyond humans. So it includes things like gengineering, hybridization, biometrics in law and business, animal testing, and vat-grown foodstuffs.

Ethics Bowl
Engage in a competition of ideas against students from all over the country as you travel to debate the ethics of various contemporary issues.
Established in 2014, our Ethics Bowl team provides a great opportunity for students to engage against collegiate teams from around the country on a series of cases concerning such topics as capital punishment, gun laws, animal rights, climate change, mass imprisonment, and migration, to name a few.
By participating in our Ethics Bowl, you’ll make friends and challenge your own ideas – all while developing worthwhile skills such as understanding diverse perspectives, analyzing arguments, public speaking, and persuading your peers on issues of great importance. No prior experience is required.

LOYOLA COMPETES IN NATIONALS
Loyola Competes in the 2019 National Bioethics Bowl Championship


Loyola University has offered to help with Stylet's restitution by providing for free the educational activities he is obliged to take. His adjudicator worked up a list of things to address his offenses, from which Stylet could then choose the options that seemed most useful to him.

In T-America, most colleges that teach science, medicine, or related fields have classes in remedial bioethics for people who fail the regular classes or have committed actual errors. These are usually offered in summer, and while most of their participants are college students, they're also open to outsiders who are struggling with bioethics. This gives the court systems, mediators, etc. somewhere to send people who need extra help in this area. Local-America offers a few degrees in bioethics but routinely fails to pay people for doing the work. Unsurprisingly the local news is then filled with bioethical mistakes and deliberate misbehavior.

Remedial Bioethics: Learning from Mistakes is a course for people who have committed errors. It reprises main ideas in the field, important processes, and how to move on. It's open to all levels, so they usually have a good mix of novice and experienced students. The discussion session covers theory and practice. The lab uses historic and current events as case examples for students to analyze and debate. They also explore their own and each other's mistakes. The class meets five days a week for eight weeks.

Stylet's classes in summer 2014:
Remedial Bioethics: Learning from Mistakes (Discussion Session)
Remedial Bioethics: Learning from Mistakes (Lab)

Topics covered include:
Foundations
* Introducing Yourselves and Your Mistakes
* Basics of Bioethics
* The Scientific Method
* The Engineering Process
* The Ethical Decision-Making Process
Principles of Bioethics
* Public Beneficence, Responsible Stewardship, Intellectual Freedom and Responsibility, Democratic Deliberation, Justice and Fairness
* Autonomy, Dignity, Integrity, Vulnerability
* Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, Justice
* Autonomy, Beneficence and non-maleficence, Veracity, Justice
* Diversity of Cross-cultural Bioethics
Working the Problem
*The Importance of Failure
* Making Safe Mistakes
* Failure Analysis
* Making Amends
* Moving On
Types of Ethics
* Metaethics
* Virtue Theories
* Duty Theories
* Consequentialist Theories
* Applied Ethics
Ethics in Context
* Personal and Public Ethics
* Scientific and Medical Bioethics
* Social and Legal Bioethics
* Ethics in the Workplace
* Developing an Ethical Code
Issues in Bioethics
* Biotechnologies
* Abilities and Disabilities
* Beginning and End of Life
* Genetics, Eugenics, Gengineering, and Transhumanism
* Globalism, Environment, and Disasters
The Mistakes Others Make
* Choosing a Frame of Reference
* Recognizing Errors
* Communicating About Errors
* Involving Authorities
* Damage Control
The Mistake You Made
* What Went Wrong in Practice
* Your Errors of Ethical Principle
* What You Will Do About It
* Your Plans for the Future
* Final Exam

Stylet's classes in the Fall 2014 semester at Loyola University:
BETH A470 Applied Bioethics (6 crs.) (T-American)
This class guides students as they select and develop a project in bioethics.
BETH A101 Introduction to Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
BIOL A101 BioInquiry (3 crs.)
MUGN O246 History of New Orleans Music (3 crs.)

* * *

I have written out T-Loyola's programs in the field of bioethics, in case anyone wants to try replicating the content with local resources.

T-Loyola offers a variety of Bioethics programs, each with slightly different requirements.
Minor in Bioethics (more requirements for graduates)
Undergraduate Certificate in Bioethics
Bachelor of Arts in Bioethics (more humanities)
Bachelor of Science in Bioethics (more science)
Graduate Certificate in Bioethics
Master of Arts in Bioethics (more humanities)
Master of Science in Bioethics (more science)
Doctor of Philosophy in Bioethics

The degrees have several options for a concentration:
Medical Bioethics (primarily physical and mental health care issues)
Scientific Bioethics (nonmedical issues in applied sciences)
Global Bioethics (mediating different preferences among nations)
Social Bioethics (choices in society and nongovernment groups)
Policy Bioethics (government and organizational decisions)
Legal Bioethics (medical and scientific issues in law)
Christian Bioethics (primarily Catholic and Jesuit)
Interfaith Bioethics (comparing beliefs and choices across different religions)
Secular Bioethics (based on philosophies rather than religions)

Loyola Course Descriptions
BETH -- Bioethics, PHIL -- Philosophy

Certificate in Bioethics (13 crs. undergraduate, 16 crs. graduate)

Undergraduate students working toward a Certificate in Bioethics are expected to develop a basic rather than advanced grasp of the subject. They may not take 400 level or graduate classes unless they test out of the prerequisites and have instructor permission.

Graduate students working toward a Certificate in Bioethics are expected to apply it to their area of expertise. They must take BETH G505: Career Connections in which they explore how to apply their bioethical awareness in the job market. They may take 400 level or graduate classes at will, drawing on approved lists from the Bioethics Major.

Required classes: (6 crs.)
• BETH A101 Introduction to Bioethics (3 crs.)
• BETH A300 Survey of Bioethics Branches (3 crs.)

Any one guest seminar in Bioethics: (1 cr.)
BETH A350 Guest Seminar in Bioethics (speakers vary) (1 cr.) (T-American)

Electives: (6 crs.)
• BETH A110 Personal Bioethics (2 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A120 Fundamentals of Bioethical Debate (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A140 Bioethical Activism & Advocacy (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A240 Moral Reasoning and Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A320 Bioethics at the Beginning of Life (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A321 Bioethics at the End of Life (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A322 Bioethics of Disability (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A333 Bioethics of the War on Drugs (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A336 Bioethics of Intellectual Property (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A360 Introduction to Bioethics Education (3 crs.) (T-American)
• CRIM A380 Ethics and Politics of Criminal Justice (3 crs.)
• PHIL A215 Ethics (3 crs.)
• PHIL A216 Ethics from Within (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL W234 Medical Ethics (3 crs.)
• PHIL W235 Ethics of Rights (3 crs.)
• PHIL W244 Law and Morality (3 crs.)
• PHIL W245 Environmental Ethics (3 crs.)
• PHIL W247 Global Ethics (3 crs.)
• PHIL W260 Worldviews and Ethics (3 crs.)
• POLS A338 Politics and Ethics of International Human Rights (3 crs.)
• RELS S242 Christian Ethics (3 crs.)

If chosen, these two electives must be taken together:
• BETH A295 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Discussion (3 crs.)
• BETH A296 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Lab (3 crs.)

Gainful Employment Information: Graduates with a Certificate in Bioethics can volunteer, teach simple classes, or give paid presentations on bioethics. Small businesses often have an employee take on bioethics responsibilities secondary to their primary job, based on having credentials such as a college certificate; this customarily comes with a pay bonus or raise. A certificate should not be considered sufficient education for a job primarily based in bioethics, for which a major is typically required. However, it makes a modest support for job retention in fields that touch on bioethics.


Minor in Bioethics (30 crs.)

All Bioethics minors must take the four Bioethics core classes. (12 crs.)
• BETH A101 Introduction to Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A400 Advanced Topics in Bioethics: Interdisciplinary Connections (3 crs.) (T-American)
These two classes must be taken together:
• BETH A295 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Discussion (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A296 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Lab (3 crs.) (T-American)

Students with a concentration must take the matching specialized Bioethics class. General Bioethics students may choose any one of these. (3 crs.)
• BETH A300 Survey of Bioethics Branches (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A301 Medical Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A302 Scientific Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A303 Global Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A304 Social Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A305 Policy Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A306 Legal Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A307 Christian Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A308 Interfaith Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A309 Secular Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)

All Bioethics minors must take one of these classes. (3 crs.)
• PHIL W252 Making Moral Decisions (3 crs.)
• CMMN A474 Ethics of Mass Communication (3 crs.)

Concentrations for the minor use the same classes as for the major. Students seeking a concentration must take 9 credits of its listed classes. Students without a concentration take 9 credits spread across at least three different concentrations. (9 crs.)

For the concentration in Medical Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL W234 Medical Ethics (3 crs.)
NURS G452 Research and Evidence-based Practice (3 crs.)
AND
One of these three classes on medical issues:
• NURS G379 Leadership: Quality & Patient Safety (3 crs.)
• NURS G384 Spirituality in Health and Illness (3 crs.)
• NURS G388 Ethics of Super-Healing (3 crs.) (T-American)

For the concentration in Scientific Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL A300 Philosophy of Science (3 crs.)
PHIL W245 Environmental Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes on aspects of science:
• PHIL A309 Naturalism and Its Critics (3 crs.)
• PHIL U243 Environmental Philosophy (3 crs.)
• PHIL U277 Minds and Machines (3 crs.)
• BIOL Y238 Genetics & Society (3 crs.)
• BIOL A450 Mad Science (3 crs.) (T-American)

For the concentration in Global Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
One of these classes on ethics around the world:
• PHIL W247 Global Ethics (3 crs.)
• PHIL W260 Worldviews and Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes on international rights:
• POLS A312 International Humanitarian Intervention (3 crs.)
• POLS A338 Politics and Ethics of International Human Rights (3 crs.)
• POLS A449 Best & Worst Nations for Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
AND
One of these classes on cultures of the world:
• PHIL U240 European World Views (3 crs.)
• LAS O200: Introduction to Contemporary Latin American Culture (3 crs.)
• POLS X325 International Relations of East Asia (3 crs.)
• SOCI X245 Peoples of Latin America (3 crs.)
• SOCI X312 African Diaspora Communities and Cultures (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Social Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PSYC A240 Social Psychology (3 crs.)
PHIL A320 Social and Political Philosophy (3 crs.)
AND
One of these four classes on social justice:
• PHIL U275 Race, Racism, & Social Justice (3 crs.)
• PHIL W264 Social Justice (3 crs.)
• BA B704: Ethics + Social Justice Week (1 cr.) (graduate)
• TEAC A705: Multiculturalism and Social Justice (3 crs.) (graduate)

For the concentration in Policy Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
POLS A305 Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3 crs.)
PHIL A330 Modern Political Thought (3 crs.)
One of these classes on policy:
• FOST A212: Foundations in Food Policy (3 crs.)
• POLS A355 Policy Research Shop (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Legal Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL W244 Law and Morality (3 crs.)
One of these classes on legal ethics:
CRIM A380 Ethics and Politics of Criminal Justice (3 crs.)
LAW L822 Bioethics and the Law (3 crs.) (graduate)
LAW L830 Comparative Reproductive Bioethics and the Law (1 cr.) (graduate)
LAW L883 Dialogues in Law and Ethics (2 crs.) (graduate)
One of these classes on legal thought:
• PHIL A225 Philosophy of Law (3 crs.)
• PSYC A215 Psychology and the Law (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Christian Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
RELS S242 Christian Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes about God:
• PHIL A340 Being and God (3 crs.)
• PHIL U278 Philosophy of God (3 crs.)
One of these classes about leadership:
• RELM 334 Ethics for Ministers (3 crs.)
• RELM 346 Catholic Social Teaching (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Interfaith Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL U239 The Self and the Sacred (3 crs.)
Two of these classes on different faiths:
• RELS V253 Varieties of Hindu Tradition (3 crs.)
• RELS V260 Introduction to Islam (3 crs.)
• RELS V267 Native American Religions (3 crs.)
• RELS V277 Tibetan & Indian Religions (3 crs.)
• RELS V377 Buddhism Across Asia (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Secular Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL A216 Ethics from Within (3 crs.) (T-American)
BA B415 Business Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes on secular beliefs:
• PHIL A211 Nontheism, Atheism, and Agnosticism (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL A212 Secular Humanism (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL A213 Ethical Culturalism (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL A214 Civil Belief Systems (3 crs.) (T-American)
http://www.religioustolerance.org/at_ag_hu.htm

All Bioethics minors take 3 credits of higher-level (300-400) electives from the Bioethics list. (3 crs)
• BETH A320 Bioethics at the Beginning of Life (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A321 Bioethics at the End of Life (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A322 Bioethics of Disability (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A323 Bioethics of Organ Transplants (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A325 Bioethics and the Brain (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A330 Clinical Bioethics (3 crs.) T-American)
• BETH A333 Bioethics of the War on Drugs (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A334 Bioethics of Artificial Intelligence (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A335 Bioethics of Medical Innovation (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A336 Bioethics of Intellectual Property (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A350 Guest Seminar in Bioethics (speakers vary) (1 cr.) (T-American)
• BETH A360 Introduction to Bioethics Education (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A361 Teaching Bioethics to Children (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A362 Teaching Bioethics to Adolescents (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A363 Teaching Bioethics to Adults (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A425 Advanced Clinical Problem-Solving (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A430 The Professional Bioethicist (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A445 Advanced Dilemmas in Bioethics: Discussion (3 crs.)
• BETH A446 Advanced Dilemmas in Bioethics: Lab (3 crs.)
• BETH A450 Internship in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A455 Service Learning in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A460 Independent Study in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A465 Research in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A470 Applied Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)

Gainful Employment Information: Graduates with a Minor in Bioethics can teach basic classes or give paid presentations on bioethics. Small businesses often have an employee take on bioethics responsibilities secondary to their primary job, based on having credentials such as a college certificate or minor, of which the minor typically outcompetes the certificate; this customarily comes with a pay bonus or raise. A minor should not be considered sufficient education for a job primarily based in bioethics, for which a major is typically required. However, it makes a strong support for job retention in fields that touch on bioethics.


Major in Bioethics (69 crs.)

Requirements given are for undergraduate students. Graduate students take BETH G301 Fundamentals of Bioethics instead of BETH A101 Introduction to Bioethics. They take BETH A445 Advanced Dilemmas in Bioethics: Discussion (3 crs.) and BETH A446 Advanced Dilemmas in Bioethics: Lab (3 crs.) instead of BETH A295 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Discussion (3 crs.) and BETH A296 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Lab (3 crs.). They take BETH G490 Bioethics Capstone instead of BETH A490 Bioethics Capstone; the graduate version requires original research in an individual project. Graduate students must take the highest level offered in sections with choices, which means primarily 300-400 level undergraduate classes or those marked G for graduate level. Undergraduates may take graduate classes if they test out of prerequisites or have instructor approval. Note that the level range in eligible classes makes some concentrations easier and some harder. Medical Bioethics has mostly graduate classes. Interfaith Bioethics can be completed with 200-level classes. The others require a mix of lower and higher levels, mostly at undergraduate level.

All Bioethics majors must take these four Bioethics core classes. (12 crs.)
• BETH A101 Introduction to Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A400 Advanced Topics in Bioethics: Interdisciplinary Connections (3 crs.) (T-American)
These two classes must be taken together:
• BETH A295 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Discussion (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A296 Dilemmas in Bioethics: Lab (3 crs.) (T-American)

Students with a concentration must take the matching specialized Bioethics class. General Bioethics students may choose any one of these. (3 crs.)
• BETH A300 Survey of Bioethics Branches (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A301 Medical Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A302 Scientific Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A303 Global Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A304 Social Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A305 Policy Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A306 Legal Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A307 Christian Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A308 Interfaith Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A309 Secular Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)

All Bioethics majors must take three Philosophy classes. (9 crs.)
PHIL W252 Making Moral Decisions (3 crs.)
AND
One of these two classes on ethics:
• PHIL A215 Ethics (3 crs.)
• PHIL W235 Ethics of Rights (3 crs.)
AND
One of these two classes on thought:
• PHIL A307 Philosophy of Mind (3 crs.)
• PHIL U272 Philosophy of Knowledge (3 crs.)

All Bioethics majors must take at least one Communication class. (3 crs.)
• CMMN A251 News Editing (3 crs.)
• CMMN A401 Law of Mass Communication (3 crs.)
• CMMN A410 Nonprofit Communication (3 crs.)
• CMMN A474 Ethics of Mass Communication (3 crs.)
• CMMN A475 Environmental Communication (3 crs.)
• CMMN X236 Understanding Media (3 crs.)

All Bioethics majors must take a capstone class in which they complete a personal or group project. It can involve original research or further development of previously published research. Group projects may involve several students, or a student contributing to a faculty project. (3 crs.)
BETH A490 Bioethics Capstone (3 crs.) (T-American)

To earn a concentration, students must choose classes from a specific set of options. Most students choose just one. A second may be taken from Elective credits without requiring approval. Students desiring a third concentration may request advisor approval to take the credits from Liberal Arts (B.A. only, not including Medical or Scientific) or Science (B.S. only, Medical or Scientific only) sections. With advisor approval, students can create a custom concentration of 9 credits on the same theme. Students without a concentration must take three classes from any of the following classes, spread across three different concentrations: (9 crs.)

For the concentration in Medical Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL W234 Medical Ethics (3 crs.)
NURS G452 Research and Evidence-based Practice (3 crs.)
AND
One of these three classes on medical issues:
• NURS G379 Leadership: Quality & Patient Safety (3 crs.)
• NURS G384 Spirituality in Health and Illness (3 crs.)
• NURS G388 Ethics of Super-Healing (3 crs.) (T-American)

For the concentration in Scientific Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL A300 Philosophy of Science (3 crs.)
PHIL W245 Environmental Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes on aspects of science:
• PHIL A309 Naturalism and Its Critics (3 crs.)
• PHIL U243 Environmental Philosophy (3 crs.)
• PHIL U277 Minds and Machines (3 crs.)
• BIOL Y238 Genetics & Society (3 crs.)
• BIOL A450 Mad Science (3 crs.) (T-American)

For the concentration in Global Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
One of these classes on ethics around the world:
• PHIL W247 Global Ethics (3 crs.)
• PHIL W260 Worldviews and Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes on international rights:
• POLS A312 International Humanitarian Intervention (3 crs.)
• POLS A338 Politics and Ethics of International Human Rights (3 crs.)
• POLS A449 Best & Worst Nations for Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
AND
One of these classes on cultures of the world:
• PHIL U240 European World Views (3 crs.)
• LAS O200: Introduction to Contemporary Latin American Culture (3 crs.)
• POLS X325 International Relations of East Asia (3 crs.)
• SOCI X245 Peoples of Latin America (3 crs.)
• SOCI X312 African Diaspora Communities and Cultures (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Social Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PSYC A240 Social Psychology (3 crs.)
PHIL A320 Social and Political Philosophy (3 crs.)
AND
One of these four classes on social justice:
• PHIL U275 Race, Racism, & Social Justice (3 crs.)
• PHIL W264 Social Justice (3 crs.)
• BA B704: Ethics + Social Justice Week (1 cr.) (graduate)
• TEAC A705: Multiculturalism and Social Justice (3 crs.) (graduate)

For the concentration in Policy Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
POLS A305 Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3 crs.)
PHIL A330 Modern Political Thought (3 crs.)
One of these classes on policy:
• FOST A212: Foundations in Food Policy (3 crs.)
• POLS A355 Policy Research Shop (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Legal Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL W244 Law and Morality (3 crs.)
One of these classes on legal ethics:
• CRIM A380 Ethics and Politics of Criminal Justice (3 crs.)
• LAW L822 Bioethics and the Law (3 crs.) (graduate)
• LAW L830 Comparative Reproductive Bioethics and the Law (1 cr.) (graduate)
• LAW L883 Dialogues in Law and Ethics (2 crs.) (graduate)
One of these classes on legal thought:
• PHIL A225 Philosophy of Law (3 crs.)
• PSYC A215 Psychology and the Law (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Christian Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
RELS S242 Christian Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes about God:
• PHIL A340 Being and God (3 crs.)
• PHIL U278 Philosophy of God (3 crs.)
One of these classes about leadership:
• RELM 334 Ethics for Ministers (3 crs.)
• RELM 346 Catholic Social Teaching (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Interfaith Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL U239 The Self and the Sacred (3 crs.)
Two of these classes on different faiths:
• RELS V253 Varieties of Hindu Tradition (3 crs.)
• RELS V260 Introduction to Islam (3 crs.)
• RELS V267 Native American Religions (3 crs.)
• RELS V277 Tibetan & Indian Religions (3 crs.)
• RELS V377 Buddhism Across Asia (3 crs.)

For the concentration in Secular Bioethics, students must take: (9 crs.)
PHIL A216 Ethics from Within (3 crs.) (T-American)
BA B415 Business Ethics (3 crs.)
AND
One of these classes on secular beliefs:
• PHIL A211 Nontheism, Atheism, and Agnosticism (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL A212 Secular Humanism (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL A213 Ethical Culturalism (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL A214 Civil Belief Systems (3 crs.) (T-American)

Bachelor of Arts students take 10 credits in classes related to the liberal arts. They cannot use Biology, Chemistry, Nursing, or Physics classes toward the major unless taking a concentration in Scientific Bioethics or Medical Bioethics, nor can they use classes from the Science list below. Electives should tend to support a creative line of study. (10 crs)
• ARTH O236 Women in Art (3 crs.)
• ARTH O320 Visible Superpowers in the Fine Arts Lecture (1 crs.)
• ARTH O321 Visible Superpowers in the Fine Arts Studio (2 crs.)
• BETH A123 Bioethics in Recent Reviews (1 cr.)
• BETH A130 Introduction to Bioethics in the Liberal Arts (3 crs.)
• BETH A131 Bioethics in Literature (3 crs.)
• BETH A132 Bioethics in the Fine Arts (3 crs.)
• BETH A133 Bioethics in the Performing Arts (3 crs.)
• BETH A261 Writing Bioethical Literature (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A350 Liberal Arts Seminar in Bioethics (speakers vary) (1 cr.) (T-American)
• BETH A435 Bioethics for Writers Discussion (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A436 Bioethics for Writers Lab (3 crs.) (T-American)
• CLHU A238 Justice In Greek Literature (3 crs.)
• DANC M226 Ethics and Morality in Movement (3 crs.) (T-American)
• DSGN M476 Ethics and Contracts (3 crs.)
• DSGN M377 Social/Political Design (3 crs.)
• ENGL A352 Literature and Environment (3 crs.)
• ENGL A374 Holocaust in Literature and Film (3 crs.)
• ENGL A376 Studies in Technoculture (3 crs.)
• ENGL A385 Women Writers (3 crs.)
• ENGL A413 Writing Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
• ENGL A418 Workshop in Ethical Writing (3 crs.)
• ENGL N204: WAL: Cyberpunk and Apocalyptic Fiction (3 crs.)
• ENGL N210: WAL: Global Identities (3 crs.)
• ENGL N212: WAL: How to Tell a True War Story (3 crs.)
• ENGL O210 Narratives: Illness & Trauma (3 crs.)
• FREN A360 Femmes de France (3 crs.)
• GERM A305 Nazi Documents in Translation (3 crs.) (T-American)
• GREK A410 Greek Philosophy (3 crs.)
• MUGN M406 Psychology of Music (3 crs.)
• MUGN O202 Music and the Human Experience (3 crs.)
• MUGN O204 Women in Music (3 crs.)
• SPAN A404 Immigration (3 crs)
• THEA O230 World Theatre I (3 crs.)
• THEA O243 Black Theatre: 1940-Present (3 crs.)
• VISA A115 Painting for Non-art Students (3 crs.)

Bachelor of Science students take 10 credits in science-related classes. They cannot use English or Religious Studies classes toward the major unless taking a concentration in Christian Bioethics or Interfaith Bioethics, nor can they use classes from the Liberal Arts list above. Electives should tend to support a scientific line of study. (10 crs)
• BETH A121 Bioethics in the News (1 cr.) (T-American)
• BETH A122 Medical Neutrality (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A262 Writing Bioethical Nonfiction (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A350 Scientific Seminar in Bioethics (speakers vary) (1 cr.) (T-American)
• BETH A431 Bioethics for Inventors Discussion (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A432 Bioethics for Inventors Lab (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A433 Bioethics for Gengineers Discussion (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A434 Bioethics for Gengineers Lab (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A447 Bioethics and Scientific Objectivity (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A448 Bioethics of Zetetics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BIOL Y262 Human Sociobiology (3 crs.)
• BIOL Y264 Global Ecology (3 crs.)
• CHEM A115 Chemistry of the Crime Scene (3 crs.)
• CHEM Y220 Chemistry of Technology (3 crs.)
• CHEM Y230 World Food and Nutrition (3 crs.)
• CRIM A270 The Science of Evil (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHYS T121 The Making of the Atomic Bomb (3 crs.)
• SCIE T129 Investigating Nature (3 crs.)

49 credits

Bioethics Electives (10 crs.)
Bioethics classes listed above but not yet taken are also eligible as electives.
• BETH A110 Personal Bioethics (2 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A111 Should I Buy ...? (2 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A112 Should I Eat ...? (2 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A120 Fundamentals of Bioethical Debate (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A140 Bioethical Activism & Advocacy (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A240 Moral Reasoning and Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A251 Biotechnology Issues (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A260 Writing About Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A320 Bioethics at the Beginning of Life (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A321 Bioethics at the End of Life (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A322 Bioethics of Disability (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A323 Bioethics of Organ Transplants (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A325 Bioethics and the Brain (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A330 Clinical Bioethics (3 crs.) T-American)
• BETH A333 Bioethics of the War on Drugs (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A334 Bioethics of Artificial Intelligence (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A335 Bioethics of Medical Innovation (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A336 Bioethics of Intellectual Property (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A350 Guest Seminar in Bioethics (speakers vary) (1 cr.) (T-American)
• BETH A360 Introduction to Bioethics Education (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A361 Teaching Bioethics to Children (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A362 Teaching Bioethics to Adolescents (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A363 Teaching Bioethics to Adults (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A425 Advanced Clinical Problem-Solving (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A430 The Professional Bioethicist (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH A445 Advanced Dilemmas in Bioethics: Discussion (3 crs.)
• BETH A446 Advanced Dilemmas in Bioethics: Lab (3 crs.)
• BETH A450 Internship in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A455 Service Learning in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A460 Independent Study in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A465 Research in Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH A470 Applied Bioethics (credits vary) (T-American)
• BETH G305 Law, Research, & Bioethics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH G306 Science, Law, & Policy (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH G307 Clinical Bioethics & Health Policy (3 crs.) (T-American)
• BETH G505: Career Connections (3 crs.) (T-American)

Interdepartmental Electives (10 crs.)
Interdepartmental classes listed above are also available as electives.
• BA B425 Professional Multiculturalism (3 crs.) (T-American)
• CMMN A484 Seminar in Mass Communications Ethics and Diversity (1 cr.)
• CNSL A864 Ethics in Individual, Marriage, and Family Counseling (3 crs.) (grad)
• HIST A316 History of Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
• HIST A317 History of Genocide (3 crs.)
• HIST A318 Nazi Germany and Ethical Issues (3 crs.) (T-American)
• INTB B310 Law for International Business (3 crs.)
• LAW L884 International Law Seminar (2 or 3 crs.) (graduate)
• LAW L885 Gender Law in Practice (3 crs.) (graduate)
• LAW L886 Environmental Law Seminar (2 crs.) (graduate)
• LIBR G210: Information Literacy & Interdisciplinary Research (3 crs.)
• LGST A452 Blue Laws (3 crs.) (T-American)
• LGST A453 FDA Law & Policy (3 crs.) (T-American)
• NURS A322 Diversity and Health (3 crs.) (T-American)
• NURS G709 Legal & Ethical Issues in Health Care (3 crs.)
• NURS G905 Ethics & Social Justice (3 crs.)
• NURS G940 Healthy Policy & Economics (3 crs.)
• PHIL A201 Practical Logic (3 crs.)
• PHIL A210 Metaphysics (3 crs.)
• PHIL A453 Ethical Superpower Use (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL U241 Philosophical Perspective on Woman (3 crs.)
• PHYS Y230 Faith, Science, and Religion (3 crs.)
• POLS X262 Law/Politics/Gay Rights (3 crs.)
• POLS X320 Global City Politics (3 crs.)
• PSYC A222 Psychology of Trauma and Disaster (3 crs.)
• PSYC A318 Psychology of Sexuality (3 crs.)
• PSYC A319 Psychology of Oppression (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PSYC A326 Environmental Psychology (3 crs.)
• PSYC A414 Health Psychology (3 crs.)
• PSYC A455 Emotion and Motivation (3 crs.)
• RELS S245 Christian Ethics & Business (3 crs.)
• RELS S330 Faith, Science, and Religion (3 crs.)
• RELS S332 Ethics of Death and Dying (3 crs.)
• RELS S344 Social Policy and the Christian (3 crs.)
• RELS V222 Religion, Secularism & Dicrimination (3 crs.)
• RELS V228 Islamic Law (3 crs.)
• RELS V234 World Religions and Ecology (3 crs.)
• RELS V325 Public Policy: Ethical Perspectives (3 crs.)
• RELS V327 Religion in the News (3 crs.)
• LAW L807 Introduction to Health Law (3 crs.) (graduate)
• LIM/LIMX 704 Spirituality, Morality, and Ethics (3 crs.) (graduate)
• LIM 841 Religion, Crime, and Justice (3 crs.) (graduate)
• LIM 885 Religious Communication 3/1 crs. (graduate)
• SOCI A219 Diversity and Inclusivity (3 crs.) (T-American)
• SOCI A220 Social Protest Movements (3 crs.)
• SOCI A310 Social Policy (3 crs.)
• SOCI A315 Contemporary Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
• SOCI A321 Body, Society and Health (3 crs.)
• SOCI A352 Global Race/Ethnic Relations (3 crs.)
• SOCI A355 Environmental Sociology (3 crs.)
• SOCI A424 Superpowered Subcultures (3 crs.) (T-American)
• SOCI X232 Social Problems (3 crs.)
• SOCI X236 Global Environmental Crisis (3 crs.)
• SOCI X320 Violence and Human Rights (3 crs.)
• TEAC A710 Exceptional Individuals in a Diverse Society (3 crs.) (graduate)
• TEAC A725 Language and Literacy in a Diverse Society (3 crs.) (graduate)
• WMST A100 Women, Culture, & Society (3 crs.)

Gainful Employment Information: Graduates with a Major in Bioethics can teach it in a public school if they also have a teaching license. Medium businesses may have a dedicated job for which a major qualifies. A Bachelor's Degree should not be considered sufficient education for a job in a large business, for which a Master's Degree is more often required. However, a Bachelor's Degree may encourage an employer to contribute toward further education.


Stylet proposes creating a new concentration in superpowers:
One class in ethics: (3 crs.)
• BETH A448 Bioethics of Zetetics (3 crs.) (T-American)
• NURS G388 Ethics of Super-Healing (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PHIL A453 Ethical Superpower Use (3 crs.) (T-American)
One class in sociology: (3 crs.)
• SOCI A219 Diversity and Inclusivity (3 crs.) (T-American)
• SOCI A220 Social Protest Movements (3 crs.)
• SOCI A315 Contemporary Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
• SOCI A424 Superpowered Subcultures (3 crs.) (T-American)
• SOCI X320 Violence and Human Rights (3 crs.)
One class in law or politics: (3 crs.)
• LGST A452 Blue Laws (3 crs.) (T-American)
• POLS A449 Best & Worst Nations for Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)

Recommended electives:
• ARTH O320 Visible Superpowers in the Fine Arts Lecture (1 crs.)
• ARTH O321 Visible Superpowers in the Fine Arts Studio (2 crs.)
• BIOL A450 Mad Science (3 crs.) (T-American)
• ENGL A355 Superpowers in Literature (3 crs.) T-American
• ENGL A413 Writing Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
• HIST A316 History of Superpowers (3 crs.) (T-American)
• PSYC A319 Psychology of Oppression (3 crs.) (T-American)
• TEAC A710 Exceptional Individuals in a Diverse Society (3 crs.) (graduate)

There are already enough classes to make a Certificate in Superpowers. To make a Minor, someone would need to add a few core classes at 100-200 level. With 51 credits already, they're well on the way to a Major, which would need at least a capstone class and probably a few more options at 100-200 level.

* * *

Enjoy a recipe for Muffuletta Sandwiches. The Creole Chocolate Chicory Brownies include Nature's Bounty Complete Protein & Vitamin Shake Mix. Big Shot soda is a New Orleans brand.

Read about August weather in New Orleans.

14 extinct animals that could be resurrected
Look at the fossil remains of this ancient creature and you might believe you're looking at a giant bear. In fact, these elephantine animals were ground sloths, most closely related to the slumbering modern-day three-toed sloth. They make good candidates for resurrection because they went extinct so recently — giant ground sloths may have still walked the Earth just 8,000 years ago at the dawn of human civilization. DNA samples have already been extracted from intact hair remains.
Because the only surviving relatives of the ground sloth are tiny by comparison, finding a surrogate mother is impossible. But it may someday be possible to develop a fetus in an artificial womb
.

Giant ground sloths once roamed the Americas. While their decline correlates with climate changes, the later extinction of island populations implicates humans as well. Some were huge, like Eremotherium eomigrans. The best known species was the Shasta ground sloth (Nothrotheriops shastensis).

Trees that make such fleshy fruits do so to entice animals to eat them, along with the seeds they contain. The seeds pass through the animal and are deposited, with natural fertilizer, away from the shade and roots of the parent tree where they are more likely to germinate. But no native animal eats Osage-orange fruits. So, what are they for? The same question could be asked of the large seed pods of the honeylocust and the Kentucky coffeetree.
---8<---
To answer these questions and solve the “riddle of the rotting fruit,” we first need to go to Costa Rica. That is where tropical ecologist Dan Janzen of the University of Pennsylvania noticed that the fruits of a mid-sized tree in the pea family called Cassia grandis were generally scorned by the native animals, but gobbled up by introduced horses and cattle. Janzen, who received the Crafoord Prize (ecology’s version of the Nobel) for his work on the co-evolution of plants and animals, had the idea that the seeds of Cassia grandis, and about 40 other large-fruited Costa Rican trees, were adapted to be dispersed by large mammals that are now extinct. He teamed up with Paul Martin, a paleoecologist at the University of Arizona, to develop the concept of ecological anachronisms.
An anachronism is something that is chronologically out of place: a typewriter or floppy disc in a modern office. Leather helmets at the Super Bowl. Or, hopefully, the internal combustion engine in the near future. An ecological anachronism is an adaptation that is chronologically out of place, making its purpose more or less obsolete. A tree with big fruits to attract huge mammals as dispersers of its seeds is anachronistic in a world of relatively small mammals.
---8<---
Much the same can be said about the honeylocust, with its sweet seedpods up to 18 inches long. It is more common than coffeetrees, and is found in upland areas because cattle have filled in for the mastodons, camels, or some other dearly departed megamammal with a sweet tooth. The big-fruited pawpaws, persimmons, desert gourds, and wild squash may also have been dispersed more efficiently by recently extinct mammals
.
-- The Trees That Miss the Mammoths

Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks
Publishing in the journal Mammalia, the researchers found that rain-filled tracks of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) were filled with frog egg masses and tadpoles. The tracks can persist for a year or more and provide temporary habitat during the dry season where alternate sites are unavailable. Trackways could also function as "stepping stones" that connect frog populations.

Causes of Extinction
"Isotopes from the bones previously suggested that the diets of saber-toothed cats and dire wolves overlapped completely, but the isotopes from their teeth give a very different picture," said DeSantis, an associate professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt. "The cats, including saber-toothed cats, American lions and cougars, hunted prey that preferred forests, while it was the dire wolves that seemed to specialize on open-country feeders like bison and horses. While there may have been some overlap in what the dominant predators fed on, cats and dogs largely hunted differently from one another."
To study these ancient predators, she employs dentistry -- taking molds of the teeth and shaving off tiny bits of enamel for chemical analysis. Information about everything the animal ate lies within the isotopes, she said. Further, the microscopic wear patterns on teeth can clarify who was eating flesh or scavenging on bones.
It's likely that those giant predators went extinct due to climate change, the arrival of humans to their environment or a combination of the two, she said, and her team is working to clarify the cause of the extinction with multiple colleagues across six institutions as part of a separate on-going study.
What they know is predators alive today in the Americas were better able to adapt their diets. Instead of only feeding on large prey, they could effectively hunt small mammals, scavenge what they could from carcasses or do both.


Compare the mammoth vs. the mastodon. See a map of distribution. Their ranges overlapped, as they preferred to eat different foods.

Explore crop adaptation to climate change. There are various methods, some more ethical than others.

Read about capybaras and quokkas.

Gene therapy can fix certain health problems. It's farther along and more popular in T-American than here.

Fertility therapy offers a variety of techniques to assist reproduction.

See Stylet's sketches of pink and blue butterflies. Here is a single blue butterfly with pink touches. This page has multicolor butterflies. This is the rainbow viceroy.
Tags: cyberfunded creativity, fantasy, fishbowl, life lessons, poetry, reading, science, weblit, writing
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