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Poem: "When Someone Is Vulnerable" - The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Poem: "When Someone Is Vulnerable"
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Comments
From: siliconshaman Date: April 13th, 2016 11:04 am (UTC) (Link)
Uh-oh.. that can't be good...

and only in America would that home be described as 'little'...
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: April 13th, 2016 07:04 pm (UTC) (Link)

Thoughts

>> Uh-oh.. that can't be good... <<

It's not good, but it could be a lot worse.

>> and only in America would that home be described as 'little'... <<

It's a one-bedroom house, and those are rare. Most houses start at two bedrooms. Also it has only one bathroom, which is a major limitation on household size. As an apartment it would be luxurious; as a house, it's small. Most of the space is in the 'extra' layers of the garage floor and the loft, which are minimally used as function space. The actual living floor crams kitchen, living room, bedroom, and bathroom into a compact space, minus what they lose for stairs. There isn't even a separate dining room, just a foldout table along the wall. Storage space on the living floor is minimal too, that's mostly in the garage.

It's huge for one person, comfortable for two, but cramped for any more than that. It wasn't designed as a permanent house, really. It was designed as a resort cabin, for which it is luxurious and one of the largest models in the batch. Those are on lots of 1-2 acres with lakeside access. Some of the small ones are in rows with only postage-stamp yards. When the resort broke up, they all sold cheap, because they're cabins and they're off the beaten path without the immediate access to town stuff all around. And the township didn't really want people to tear down the cabins and rebuild a bunch of bigger houses crammed awkwardly together. The cabins at least fit the space nicely. But only a few of them are suitable for family living over the long term. Despite that, a number of families bought them because that's what they could afford, and have members regularly sleeping on futons or hide-a-bed couches.

Ansel has the couch in the office, a hide-a-bed couch and a futon in the loft, of which the futon is the customary guest space. It's not a real bedroom, though, the loft isn't even divided. It just has three sort of lobes: one used for games, one for exercise, and the futon for sleeping with a couple of folding screens to provide minimal privacy.

Size depends partly on culture, because a big country requires different skills (tolerating longer travel times) than a small country (tolerating dense population). But there are still practical concerns, and the most limiting factor in housing is the ratio of butts to toilet seats. You can sleep on the floor, but peeing outside leads to problems.

Another factor in this location is that, being a former resort, it does have some communal spaces like public toilets, shower houses, an administrative center, and a recreation building that help take up the slack for the private buildings being small. So another consideration is how much time you spend at home and what other facilities you have available. The better the public facilities are, the less space you need as an individual. Some of the cabins are like efficiency or one-bedroom apartments.

A lot of the town living space is similar in terms of apartments or live/work buildings with office/retail space below a one or two bedroom apartment. But there's a lot more to do in Cambridge Commons. The former resort is more popular with folks who prefer nature activities to urban ones. That capacious garage under Ansel's cabin is double-long and originally meant for parking boats. You couldn't get a car into the second bay, that one's for bikes. Routinely parking two cars in a double-long garage would be a nuisance unless one person always got home earlier and left later than the other, or one vehicle was only used for occasional purposes. As a place to live, it has definite pros and cons, so you have to think about whether you're going to miss the stuff it lacks or enjoy the stuff it has.
From: siliconshaman Date: April 13th, 2016 07:34 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

Ansels home is twice the size of the average UK two bedroom house... although as you point out, that's not taking into account functional space. Still, I'd like to have a 'little' home like that, given that even deducting the garage space, it's bigger than where I live now... and much nicer looking.

And yeah, if you're going to crash land somewhere, at Ansels feet is a pretty good point to do it.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: April 13th, 2016 09:12 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

>> Ansels home is twice the size of the average UK two bedroom house... although as you point out, that's not taking into account functional space. <<

The UK is a lot more walkable than America, though, even T-America. That influences house size. If you expect to do a lot of your socializing elsewhere, and there are places you can borrow things so you don't need your own copy of everything, then smaller living is more feasible. The more you have to do on your own at home, the more room you need to store it all.

One reason why Ansel, as a single person, bought a house sized for a couple with overflow space for guests and recreation on different floors is because he's a cop. He loves his job, he loves people, but it's still stressful at times. So his sociability varies widely. This way Ansel can come home and crash alone, hole up with his girlfriend, hide in his office, go biking, exercise in private, have a party, go to the community building and hang out with friends ... it depends on his energy level and social interests in the moment.

>> Still, I'd like to have a 'little' home like that, given that even deducting the garage space, it's bigger than where I live now... and much nicer looking. <<

It is a really nice cabin.

>> And yeah, if you're going to crash land somewhere, at Ansels feet is a pretty good point to do it. <<

Yep. Ansel may be worried about how wrecked Turq is, but the fact that Turq keeps seeking him out -- however reluctantly -- for help is a huge sign of progress.
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