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The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Arapaho Language School
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ideealisme From: ideealisme Date: October 20th, 2008 09:54 am (UTC) (Link)
This interests me as the Irish language has been in decline for a long time. We are made to learn it at school, which I disliked at the time, but value now, as I still have a couple of words.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 20th, 2008 03:47 pm (UTC) (Link)

Hmm...

From what I've heard, Irish is starting to make a comeback in recent years. There are Irish-language newsletters now, language clubs -- subsidized ones in some places -- and talk about an immersion school. Some preschools and daycare centers also teach Irish, which is vital.
ideealisme From: ideealisme Date: October 20th, 2008 07:05 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

it's not being widely spoken in the community, though, outside gaeltacht areas, parts of the country where native Irish is spoken as a first language. People get hung up and embarrassed about it - plus the grammar is kind of tricky. It is a great language for poetry though - a lot of assonances and echoes. I find the indirectness has survived in our inability as a race and nation to talk real, something which I, who have a distinctly non-Irish sensibility, find irritating.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 21st, 2008 01:22 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

Yes, and those features are built into the poetic forms, too. Trying to write Irish poetry in English is a real pain.

English has its own style of indirectness, though -- most notably the "passive exonerative." ("Mistakes were made.") This makes it a popular choice for business and politics.
ideealisme From: ideealisme Date: October 21st, 2008 11:42 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

"most notably the "passive exonerative." ("Mistakes were made.") "

translated into Irish - "It failed on me" - maybe slightly more direct but not much!
ideealisme From: ideealisme Date: October 21st, 2008 11:43 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

I meant transliterated, sorry.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 21st, 2008 05:12 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

*laaaaaauuuuugh*

I love it! I'll bet this is where Americans got the phrase "It died on me" (referring either to something like a plant that actually ceased to live, or something like a car that merely ceased to function).
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