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Poem: "Lawless, Winged, and Unconfined" - The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Poem: "Lawless, Winged, and Unconfined"
Here is the linkback perk for the March 4, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. If you link to the fishbowl, make a comment and include the URL to reveal a verse of this poem.  If you link on different services, you can get multiple verses.

This poem is spillover from the February 4, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl.  It was inspired by prompts from Sylvaine, aldersprig, the_vulture, and rix_scaedu.  It also fills the "Magical / Soul bond" square in my 2-1-14 card for the Cottoncandy Bingo fest.

All 18 verses have been posted.  Linkers include: siliconshaman, janetmiles, rix_scaedu, siege, technoshaman, DW user Jjhunter.


"Lawless, Winged, and Unconfined"


There was nothing of coercion
in what lay between
Scott and the incubus,
yet there was still a force
that connected their souls.

It was a paradox,
and it puzzled them both --
something had broken
the old service bond
that the incubus once bore,
and now drew him and Scott
closer together every day.

There was nothing, really,
that made Scott offer
the use of his futon
and neglect to take it back,
only a sense that he wanted
the incubus to have somewhere to go.

There was nothing, really,
that made the incubus stay there,
curled like a round red brick
on the creamy sheets,
only a sense that it felt right
to be in this place, this time.

Scott was an architect,
and so that was how
he imagined their link.

It was like an arch, a bridge,
a flying buttress -- something
that soared between them
and made them stronger.

It was what made Scott
ask about Hell and listen
to the slow unfolding confession.

It was what made the incubus
ask about architecture and ideas,
spooling out inspiration
as he once spooled threads of lust.

Then, too, it was in Scott's gentle reply
when the incubus asked when
the sexlessness would wear off,
explaining that no, it wasn't just a phase,
it had always been so for him
and might now be so for the incubus.

They were strangers,
they were different species,
and yet they were in harmony.

They never expected to fall in love --
and it was nothing so sudden
as falling from grace --
but it happened anyway,
falling like water, cool and lucid.

It was hard for the incubus
to conceive of love without sexual desire,
although he understood lust without love
quite readily from past experience.

When the Fledging came,
they both sprouted the wings
of Baltimore orioles,
black and brick-orange
and beautiful.

It was Scott who found
the old William Blake quote --

Love to faults is always blind,
always is to joy inclined.
Lawless, winged, and unconfined,
and breaks all chains from every mind. --


suggesting that it might explain
how the incubus came to be
uncoupled from Hell and
wrapped up with himself instead.

The incubus nodded,
and said that made sense.

The two of them went on
as they had been, slowly
making a life together,
building foundations brick by brick,
weaving ideas like blades of grass.

* * *
Notes:

"Love to faults is always blind, always is to joy inclined. Lawless, winged, and unconfined, and breaks all chains from every mind."

Love to faults is always blind;
Always is to joy inclin’d,
Lawless, wing’d and unconfin’d,
And breaks all chains from every mind.

Deceit to secrecy confin’d,
Lawful, cautious and refin’d;
To anything but interest blind,
And forges fetters for the mind
.

Blake: Gnomic Verses VII in The Poetical Works of William Blake, ed. John Sampson. Oxford Univ. Press, 1918, p. 194.  (Thanks to thnidu for tracking down the correct citation.   mdlbear says it's in William Blake: "Poems From Blake's Notebooks."  The site where I first found the quote incorrectly attributed it to William Shakespeare.)

Fallingwater is a famous house.
http://www.fallingwater.org/assets/Fallingwater_Architecture.pdf

Baltimore orioles are skilled architects, weaving a nest that hangs under a branch.

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Current Mood: busy busy

23 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 5th, 2014 12:13 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Four links

Thank you! I've posted your links.
siege From: siege Date: March 4th, 2014 11:56 pm (UTC) (Link)
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 5th, 2014 12:12 am (UTC) (Link)

Okay...

Your new verse is up.
From: technoshaman Date: March 5th, 2014 05:28 am (UTC) (Link)
Posted to FB...
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 5th, 2014 05:31 am (UTC) (Link)

Thank you!

I've posted your new verse.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 7th, 2014 07:35 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Links to the unsold poetry page

Thank you! I've added your three new verses.
janetmiles From: janetmiles Date: March 10th, 2014 08:08 pm (UTC) (Link)
Ooh, interesting and cool that they both fledged the same bird.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 10th, 2014 08:18 pm (UTC) (Link)

Yes...

It doesn't happen routinely, but sometimes there are same-species clusters within families or other associated groups. It's more likely to happen with commoner birds such as sparrows or pigeons. They both came up with this one for the architecture, because it's such a strong affinity for them.
janetmiles From: janetmiles Date: March 18th, 2014 06:16 pm (UTC) (Link)

More links to the bonus fishbowl

ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 18th, 2014 06:21 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: More links to the bonus fishbowl

Thank you! Your three new verses are up.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: April 5th, 2014 02:09 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: And four more links to the April unsold poetry post

Thank you! That finishes "Lawless, Winged, and Unconfined" plus it reveals two new verses of "Hatching into the Future."
mdlbear From: mdlbear Date: April 5th, 2014 04:47 am (UTC) (Link)
"Although he understand lust..." s/understand/understood/

I like this a lot. You do asexual characters really well.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: April 5th, 2014 07:55 pm (UTC) (Link)

Fixed!

>> "Although he understand lust..." s/understand/understood/ <<

Thanks for spotting the typo.

>> I like this a lot. You do asexual characters really well. <<

Yay! I'm happy to hear that. You can ask for more aces in any relevant prompt call. I've got a bunch of them now.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: April 5th, 2014 05:08 am (UTC) (Link)
Lovely.
Whence, specifically, the Shakespeare bit?
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: April 5th, 2014 05:10 am (UTC) (Link)

Hmm...

I don't know which Shakespeare piece the quote came from; it wasn't cited where I found it.

I'm glad you like the poem!
mdlbear From: mdlbear Date: April 6th, 2014 02:27 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

I've seen it variously cited as "Midsummer Night's Dream" and one of the sonnets, but I searched and didn't find it in either work. It can definitely be found in William Blake: "Poems From Blake's Notebooks".
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: April 6th, 2014 02:30 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

Huh. Thanks for the extra note.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: April 6th, 2014 06:48 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

Blake: Gnomic Verses VII in The Poetical Works of William Blake, ed. John Sampson. Oxford Univ. Press, 1918, p. 194.
Love to faults is always blind;
Always is to joy inclin’d,
Lawless, wing’d and unconfin’d,
And breaks all chains from every mind.
 
Deceit to secrecy confin’d,
Lawful, cautious and refin’d;
To anything but interest blind,
And forges fetters for the mind.

Not the Shake. MIT's Shakespeare website ("Welcome to the Web's first edition of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare. This site has offered Shakespeare's plays and poetry to the Internet community since 1993.") doesn't have it.

Bless and confound you, I've just spent an hour or more on this! My complete answer is here, at the bottom.


ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: April 7th, 2014 04:12 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

Wow! Thanks for this. I have updated the notes accordingly.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: April 7th, 2014 04:18 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Hmm...

:-) Yer we'c'me, ma'am.

«It was Scott who found
the old Shakespeare quote»

So, like so many others, Scott thinks it's Shakespeare.
23 comments or Leave a comment