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Poem: "Peacebrokering" - The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Poem: "Peacebrokering"

This is the second freebie for the fishbowl, courtesy of new prompters tigerbright and Dreamwidth user Rainflowermoon.  It belongs to the Silk Road Allies project.




Peacebrokering


When the Syrian civil war
heated up with claims of
chemical warfare and
weapons of mass destruction,

the Arab League called for
international action and
America threatened a solitary attack.

China and Italy looked at each other
and said, "Enough is enough."

China did not want
two of its major export markets
fighting with each other.

Italy did not want
another wave of refugees
pouring out of Syria, more than
the European Union could handle.

So they set forth a combined effort
on two separate fronts:
Italy insisting on an international mandate
for any action again Syria, and
China discouraging America
from attacking Syria alone.

China used its economic weight
to encourage sanctions instead of combat,
while Italy used its diplomatic clout
to hold the moral high ground of nonviolence.
They sent intrepid mediators
to urge Syria toward peace.

Nobody was fully satisfied,
but they managed to avoid
spreading the war even further,
and the saber rattling died back down
to the dull roar typical in the Middle East.

It's always easier to play the board
when the right hands knows
what the left hand is doing
while other people forget
how well they work together.

* * *

Notes:

Read about the Syrian Civil War.

Italy wants a UN mandate and worries about refugee problems.

China exports a lot of stuff to Syria and America.  China has warned America not to attack Syria.

The Arab League wants international action against Syria, although not all of its member countries agree.

Although the American president is considering a strike on Syria, this approach is unpopular with the public.  Some people say there are no good options, while others believe nonviolent methods could work.

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Comments
From: technoshaman Date: September 4th, 2013 04:04 am (UTC) (Link)
One can *hope*...

Politics makes strange bedfellows. I hope this odd partnership bears the fruits of peace, uneasy or not...
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: September 6th, 2013 07:59 am (UTC) (Link)

Yes...

I hope so too.
marina_bonomi From: marina_bonomi Date: September 4th, 2013 09:13 am (UTC) (Link)
Beautiful. Let's hope it does work like this, even though China and Italy are working each on her own in this continuum.

>while Italy used its religious clout
to hold the moral high ground of nonviolence.<

Just a note on this, though: Italy has no "religious clout". That is the Holy See, whose residence is Vatican City, an indipendent state.

Edited for typo, sorry

Edited at 2013-09-04 09:14 am (UTC)
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: September 4th, 2013 09:47 am (UTC) (Link)

Thoughts

>> Beautiful. <<

Thank you!

>> Let's hope it does work like this, even though China and Italy are working each on her own in this continuum. <<

I hope so too, though it's a slim chance.

>> while Italy used its religious clout
to hold the moral high ground of nonviolence.


Just a note on this, though: Italy has no "religious clout". That is the Holy See, whose residence is Vatican City, an independent state. <<

I'm aware of that technical distinction. In practice, looking at history makes me think that Italy does have religious clout. There are two reasons for this: 1) Roman Catholicism tends to favor Italy due to the seat location. 2) People tend to conflate Vatican City and Italy, Roman Catholicism and Italian politics. These things are not the same, but if you map their interests and influence, they run together more often than not. That's my perspective as a scholar who doesn't live in Italy. The view from inside may be different.

If the phrasing in the context of the poem is unclear, though, I'm potentially open to changing it if something better can be found.

Edited for typo, sorry
marina_bonomi From: marina_bonomi Date: September 4th, 2013 12:17 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

>People tend to conflate Vatican City and Italy, Roman Catholicism and Italian politics.<

Honestly that is more a 'man on the street', outsider point of view (at least for °this°continuum, things might be different in the Silk Road alternate). No italian politician or diplomat is going to use any religious motivation while working on a political issue. Neither does, for instance the St. Egidius Community (which °is° a Catholic movement) when they mediate in international issues and conflicts.

Do with this what you wish. *shrugs*.

Our politicians and diplomats, instead, often mention our tradition of international cooperation, Italy as a bridge between the Southern Mediterranian and continental Europe and the fact that Italy was one of the founding members of the EU just after 2nd World War, with all the difficulties that working together in that contest entailed.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: September 8th, 2013 10:57 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

… (??) … Ah ha. I'm almost 100% sure that you mean "working together in that context".

Edited at 2013-09-08 11:43 pm (UTC)
marina_bonomi From: marina_bonomi Date: September 9th, 2013 06:11 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

Ooops, yes! That was the idea, sorry!
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: September 22nd, 2013 04:00 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

Thanks for the feedback. I have tweaked this a little, and linked it on the Silk Road Allies page.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: September 8th, 2013 07:41 pm (UTC) (Link)
So mote it be!
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: September 9th, 2013 07:19 am (UTC) (Link)

Thank you!

We can hope.
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