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The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Poem: "Home Is Where"

This poem came out of the March 5, 2013 Poetry Fishbowl.  It was inspired by prompts from rix_scaedu, kelkyag, and janetmiles.  It also fills the "7) Codex" slot in the Vellum list for the Rainbowfic fest.  It has been sponsored by Shirley Barrette.  This poem belongs to the series One God's Story of Mid-Life Crisis.



Home Is Where


The little shack of a temple
was unassuming but promising,
Shaeth thought.

During his tenure as God of Evil,
he had held services in temples of marble
with fixtures of gold and jewels.

As God of Drunks,
he held services in a temple of wood
whose only jewel-like content
was the window that Trobby had made
from broken bottles and bricking-mud
because the pane was empty.

The place wasn't much to look at,
but as Trobby said,
"It's a step up in the world
from a hole in the ground."
Since Shaeth had, in fact,
found Trobby sleeping in a muddy hollow
beside a fallen log, this was an accomplishment.

"It will do," Shaeth said.
It provided a place to hold services by day
and to let drunks sleep by night.

"It has kind of homey feeling to it,"
Trobby said.  "I think.
I never actually had much of a home."

Shaeth was discovering
that this was true of a great many drunks.
"They say that home is where,
when you have to go there,
they have to take you in," he said.

Certainly the warm dry space
did a good job of attracting followers
who needed what simple things
Shaeth could provide these days.

A place to sleep.
A remedy for hangovers.
These were things
that Shaeth had promised
to his new followers.

Trobby straightened the rag rug
that covered part of the floor.
He said, "It's like coming home
to somewhere you've never been before."

Shaeth looked at the tumble of unwashed bodies
sleeping along one wall of the temple,
and wondered if he could rig a gutter and rain barrel
to collect some water for bathing.
At least they slept safer here than in the street:
no one wanted to tangle with Shaeth.

"Home is where," said Glenta,
"when you want to go there,
they want to take you in."

"Put that version in the codex,"
Shaeth instructed.

Glenta took out the pages
in which she inscribed the liturgy
of Shaeth, God of Drunks,
and added it to the list of homilies.


* * *

Notes:

“Home is the place where, when you have to go there,
They have to take you in.”
-- Robert Frost

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Current Mood: busy busy

16 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
janetmiles From: janetmiles Date: March 10th, 2013 01:49 am (UTC) (Link)
I like Glenta's version better. *nods*
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 10th, 2013 04:37 am (UTC) (Link)

Yes...

So do I.
kyleri From: kyleri Date: March 11th, 2013 01:54 am (UTC) (Link)
...I would like to go home now.

(It's not raining on my face. I am fucking bawling. Right now, I'm stuck in the first sort of 'home'...and getting desperate for the second.)
rowyn From: rowyn Date: March 11th, 2013 05:53 pm (UTC) (Link)
It would be a lovely world where everyone had a home by Glenta's definition.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 12th, 2013 02:19 am (UTC) (Link)

Yes...

So mote it be.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: October 14th, 2013 11:57 pm (UTC) (Link)
Robert Frost, "The Death of the Hired Man", 122-123.

And a bit before it:
Part of a moon was falling down the west,
Dragging the whole sky with it to the hills.
Its light poured softly in her lap. She saw
And spread her apron to it. She put out her hand
Among the harp-like morning-glory strings,
Taut with the dew from garden bed to eaves,
As if she played unheard the tenderness
That wrought on him beside her in the night.
“Warren,” she said, “he has come home to die:
You needn’t be afraid he’ll leave you this time.”


Edited at 2013-10-15 12:04 am (UTC)
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 15th, 2013 12:07 am (UTC) (Link)

O_O

I like Frost, but that's a creepy poem.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: October 15th, 2013 12:39 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

I didn't think I'd have to be explicit.
Did you not know?
Part of a moon was falling down the west,
Dragging the whole sky with it to the hills.
Its light poured softly in her lap. She saw
And spread her apron to it. She put out her hand
Among the harp-like morning-glory strings, // 110
Taut with the dew from garden bed to eaves,
As if she played unheard the tenderness
That wrought on him beside her in the night.
“Warren,” she said, “he has come home to die:
You needn’t be afraid he’ll leave you this time.” // 115

“Home,” he mocked gently.

“Yes, what else but home?
It all depends on what you mean by home.
Of course he’s nothing to us, any more
Than was the hound that came a stranger to us // 120
Out of the woods, worn out upon the trail.”

“Home is the place where, when you have to go there,
They have to take you in.”


“I should have called it
Something you somehow haven’t to deserve.” // 125
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 15th, 2013 12:58 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

I do know.

It's still a creepy poem.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: October 15th, 2013 02:03 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

Oh yes, though I think maybe I find less so than you do. What surprised me was that you didn't credit it, when you are normally so scrupulously informative with your notes.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 15th, 2013 09:43 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

Citation added. Thanks for the catch.

That's like marking typos, by the way. If you mean to tell me that I've forgotten a reference, which is useful to know, then you need to copy the quote, put the reference under it, and say something like "missing citation: possible source." Otherwise I'm liable to do what I did here, and comment on the content of the source material instead of remembering that it's something I should have cited.

thnidu From: thnidu Date: October 16th, 2013 03:27 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

D'ohhh! Of course! I guess it was a misplaced attempt to be tactful.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 16th, 2013 07:05 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

Misplaced is a very precise description. I don't have the licensed version of the Tact program. I had to cobble up something from scratch, and it does not have all the same bells and whistles as the factory model.

By all means, be polite; don't call names or use logical fallacies or make fun of the material. But if there's a flaw, point it out specifically. If there's a desired action, it is best presented as a straightforward request. If the approach is oblique, I'm likely to miss it; I parse Hint culture very poorly. Conversely I am pretty difficult to offend, and don't care about a lot of things that other people seem to obsess over.

If I haven't mentioned this recently, you are among my more reliable online editors, and I value your input greatly. my_partner_doug spots a lot of typos right after I post them, and I think you get most of the rest.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: October 16th, 2013 08:59 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

Thank you for the specific interactional advice, and I'm very glad to be able to help. :-)
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 16th, 2013 09:07 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

You're welcome. I'm kind of an odd duck, and not everyone is willing or able to go along with my quirks.
thnidu From: thnidu Date: October 17th, 2013 01:07 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_O

Or quacks. <eg>
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