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The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Acing the Rainbow Bechdel
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marina_bonomi From: marina_bonomi Date: January 14th, 2013 06:40 pm (UTC) (Link)
Well, it all hinges on how one defines 'PoC'.

I discovered some time ago that I can't write anything narrative that doesn't involve Chinese characters, but no Chinese I ever spoke with see themselves as people of color.

That said 'Ming Li and the Charmed Phoenix' has no non-Chinese characters at all, 'Cai Luoma and the Partians' has a lenghty conversation about the dangers of sea-travel (are Parthians PoC? No idea), the romance I'm writing and serializing now is set in Italy (and I've met quite a few US folks who think 'white = WASP, Italian= not-WASP = PoC'to wonder where we fit), the male main character, the antagonist,and another important character are Chinese, there is also a Moroccan character (if you consider Berbers PoC, I don't), more will enter later on and there will be plenty of conversation that has noting to do with Europeans at all.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: January 14th, 2013 07:26 pm (UTC) (Link)

Thoughts

>> I discovered some time ago that I can't write anything narrative that doesn't involve Chinese characters, but no Chinese I ever spoke with see themselves as people of color. <<

Huh. Fascinating. Some of the Chinese-American folks definitely do, although not all of them seem to.

I suspect a key factor in this is how much racial discrimination a person experiences locally. The higher that goes, the more likely they may be to consider themselves people of color.

>> the romance I'm writing and serializing now is set in Italy (and I've met quite a few US folks who think 'white = WASP, Italian= not-WASP = PoC'to wonder where we fit), <<

That's another point of variation, although I did not include Fiorenza the Wisewoman (which I think is ALL Italian except for the Spanish vampire) in my list.
marina_bonomi From: marina_bonomi Date: January 14th, 2013 07:58 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

>Huh. Fascinating. Some of the Chinese-American folks definitely do, although not all of them seem to.

I suspect a key factor in this is how much racial discrimination a person experiences locally. The higher that goes, the more likely they may be to consider themselves people of color.<

Indeed, but I believe other factors come into play as well.

For one, Italy's history is mainly one of emigration, mass immigration is a very recent thing for us (in 1992 the Chinese residents in Italy were 15,000 in 2011 they were 209,934)so while there are problems we don't have the kind of luggage the USA have.

Moreover, most of the Chinese here are Han born and raised in the PRC, so they are used to being the 'ethnic norm', it's the ethnic minorities who are the PoCs of China.

another thing is that, in the way we use it when speaking Putonghua, 'waiguoren' ('person from outside', 'foreigner') really means 'non-Chinese'. I use it in the same way, so I speak of myself a 'Putonghua-speaking foreigner' even though I was born here (and it took a conversation with my co-ordinator to realize it, it didn't really register before).
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: January 15th, 2013 12:16 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

>>Moreover, most of the Chinese here are Han born and raised in the PRC, so they are used to being the 'ethnic norm', it's the ethnic minorities who are the PoCs of China.<<

That makes sense.

>>another thing is that, in the way we use it when speaking Putonghua, 'waiguoren' ('person from outside', 'foreigner') really means 'non-Chinese'. I use it in the same way, so I speak of myself a 'Putonghua-speaking foreigner' even though I was born here (and it took a conversation with my co-ordinator to realize it, it didn't really register before).<<

*laugh* Well, yeah, it's the applicable term because it's like 'goy' referring to outside-a-People not outside-a-place in terms of foreign-ness.

It's interesting to see where people draw lines.
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