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Read "Balancing Unfairness" by Rix_scaedu - The Wordsmith's Forge — LiveJournal
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ysabetwordsmith
Read "Balancing Unfairness" by Rix_scaedu
rix_scaedu wrote the story "Balancing Unfairness" based on my prompt about excluding people from prom night.  It's a very thoughtful piece.

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rix_scaedu From: rix_scaedu Date: October 24th, 2012 01:47 am (UTC) (Link)
Thank you.
From: technoshaman Date: October 24th, 2012 02:26 am (UTC) (Link)
I had to read the prompt, and do a little googling, to get it. Oooers!

Now, I do not know enough tradition about the Baron to know whether there wi.... oh. Hang on.

*Fires an extension request* :D
From: technoshaman Date: October 24th, 2012 02:27 am (UTC) (Link)
Just so you know, ysabetwordsmith, this idea of micropay fiction... is *addicting* :)
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 24th, 2012 02:46 am (UTC) (Link)

Yes...

I feel the same way. I really like what kajones_writing does, the size of the installments and the various ways of getting extensions. rix_scaedu and aldersprig are other microfic favorites, working in smaller size, but they've both got multiple series I follow too. With magazine and book prices going so high these days, it's nice to have an option for something that's customizable and available in affordable sample-size packets. Plus you can get more of the stories you like best.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 24th, 2012 02:42 am (UTC) (Link)

SQUEE!!

I'm delighted by the idea of an extension. I may be broke, but at least I have a lively audience and, every once in a while, somebody nabs one of my prompted pieces like this. So thank you.
From: technoshaman Date: October 24th, 2012 04:48 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: SQUEE!!

If you're like other author folk I know, and I suspect you are, your bank account may read "not much"... but your *people account* would make Warren Buffett green with envy.

I have a decent pay packet, and some of the most awesome people in my life. I'd take the people over the bucks *any day*.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 24th, 2012 06:10 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: SQUEE!!

>>If you're like other author folk I know, and I suspect you are, your bank account may read "not much"... <<

True.

>>but your *people account* would make Warren Buffett green with envy.<<

True online, less so in person.

>>I have a decent pay packet, and some of the most awesome people in my life. I'd take the people over the bucks *any day*.<<

Sooth.
sagaciouslu From: sagaciouslu Date: October 24th, 2012 04:01 am (UTC) (Link)
I'm sorry for the dumb question, but I confess that I don't understand the premise. It's likely because I'm foreign.

'Prom night' is, as far as I understand it, the major social event in a high school calendar. However, what is this about excluding people? Is this done often or as a matter of course? It seems to me to be rather...odd. I can see exclusion based on something like major academic / non-academic misconduct, but that's about it.

If anyone is inclined, could you please enlighten me?
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 24th, 2012 04:32 am (UTC) (Link)

Okay...

>>I'm sorry for the dumb question, but I confess that I don't understand the premise. It's likely because I'm foreign.<<

It's not a dumb question. I don't mind explaining in more detail.

>>'Prom night' is, as far as I understand it, the major social event in a high school calendar.<<

Correct.

>>However, what is this about excluding people? Is this done often or as a matter of course? It seems to me to be rather...odd. I can see exclusion based on something like major academic / non-academic misconduct, but that's about it.<<

Sometimes people do mean things like pick on students who are different -- fat or brown or pregnant or lesbian or whatever. There have been several cases of the "popular" students trying to block "undesirable" students from attending prom. Academic exclusions, as mentioned in this story, have also occurred.

Some stuff to read:
http://www.glaad.org/publications/promkit
http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2012/04/20/exclusive-archdiocese-ruling-bares-student-from-attending-promo-solo/
http://rubyvroom.tumblr.com/post/5218053027/the-alabama-senate-passes-a-bill-to-block-undocumented
http://www.advocate.com/news/daily-news/2010/04/05/aclu-investigating-fake-prom

We had a girl-girl pair at my prom, actually. We snickered about it, a bit, because we were young and it stood out. But none of us would have told them not to come, or not to dance together, and I don't think anyone went up to them and said anything mean. It was a pretty liberal school.

I don't think it's okay to make a big deal out of a social event and then tell some people they can't come. That's snotty and mean. It's a way of telling people they aren't good enough, they're not real people. So I wanted a story where that nonsense took off in a different direction.
sagaciouslu From: sagaciouslu Date: October 24th, 2012 04:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
Thank you. I guess that I am not surprised that cliquish high school social maevens try to control the participation in social events. I am horrified when adults take a role in being petty and exclusionary. Of course, I work with adults, many of whom appear to have the social graces of poorly reared kindergartners. Feh.
siege From: siege Date: October 24th, 2012 11:46 am (UTC) (Link)
As a historical note, "prom night" comes from "the Promenade", a tradition of the American South, a coming-of-age event when eligible children of wealthy or notable persons gathered at a large ball to present themselves to society. It was originally about the suitability of certain people for participation in high society... but as fortunes and culture changed, everyone wanted a promenade.

Eventually, public schools held them, because the industrial-style school building was one of the places large enough to hold most of a given town's people, and everyone knew each other because of them. As this was originally a coming-of-age event, "high" schools (grades 9 - 12, generally) were the most common places to have a prom. And high school students can be cliquish anyway.

So proms have a history of exclusion that, though no longer directly encouraged by most of the surrounding society, is implicit in the nature of social groups in most schools. Being included, then, is a statement by the school and/or its students that they choose to welcome those who are different.
sagaciouslu From: sagaciouslu Date: October 24th, 2012 06:25 pm (UTC) (Link)
The only similar thing we have here is a debutante's ball put on by the Austrian-Canadian society where the nubility dance the polonaise as their introduction into society. However, this function is patronized mostly by the children of European immigrants (for Europe, here, read roughly Germany and points east). So, issues of involvement and / or exclusion are limited to a pretty small (and specific) ethno-linguistic-cultural group.

Our closest equivalent - high school 'grad' - is mostly just a dinner / speeches / dance affair where, essentially, if you go to that school in your graduating year, you can attend.

However, and as expected, this 'inclusion' above has no bearing on the cliquish, private after parties where all of the festering worst of high school drama plays itself out, exclusionary ethics included...
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: October 24th, 2012 06:31 pm (UTC) (Link)

Well...

What is acceptable at a private event on private property is very different from what is acceptable at a public event on government property. That's something people seem to have missed in the switch, and now it's causing lawsuits.
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