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Poem: "The Girl He Brought Home" - The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Poem: "The Girl He Brought Home"
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Comments
kelkyag From: kelkyag Date: January 5th, 2012 08:41 pm (UTC) (Link)
Indeed. I expect that "security blanket" is not in his usual job description. :)

One of the things I'd wondered about Melinda was whether she'd grow up a "normal" magic-oblivious human, or whether she'd turn out to be "family", as the daughter of the house described one of her friends. Answered! I do increasingly wonder, though, whether there is actually a substantial number of "normal" humans, or mostly an awful lot of people who don't talk to each other about the things they think are too weird for other people to believe.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: January 6th, 2012 12:57 am (UTC) (Link)

Thoughts

>>Indeed. I expect that "security blanket" is not in his usual job description.<<

True. His usual job is all about being scary -- banging on pipes, eating the bad boys and girls, being one of the things that go bump in the night. That's part of his nature, the way the wolf is part of the woods. But he's a person, and he has free will. Although there are some constraints he can't or won't break, he can usually manage to ensure that justice gets done.

At home, he can let down his guard some and be himself, show the gentler side. Sometimes, though, somebody succeeds in pulling that out when he wasn't intending to show it. *chuckle* I bet that girl had him wrapped around her little finger before he was out the door of her parents' house.

>>One of the things I'd wondered about Melinda was whether she'd grow up a "normal" magic-oblivious human, or whether she'd turn out to be "family", as the daughter of the house described one of her friends. <<

Her affinity for reptiles seems to be innate, along with her ability to see through the glamour that usually protects many of the mystical beings from human notice. A vivid encounter can easily cement that into permanent interaction with the shadow world.

>>I do increasingly wonder, though, whether there is actually a substantial number of "normal" humans, or mostly an awful lot of people who don't talk to each other about the things they think are too weird for other people to believe.<<

Likely so. It's kind of a spectrum: those who WILL not notice regardless of what goes on around them, those who catch a glimpse now and then but dismiss it, those who glimpse and wonder but may or may not talk about it, those who encounter the mysterious and follow it, and those who grow up with it. The two realms interpenetrate, but not everyone has (or wants) access to both. There are people who can live their whole lives and never meet anything out of the ordinary because it's just not in their reality, people who have the potential for both and can choose, people who would never find it on their own but can notice it if they go somewhere more active, and so forth.
kelkyag From: kelkyag Date: January 7th, 2012 06:17 am (UTC) (Link)
I bet that girl had him wrapped around her little finger before he was out the door of her parents' house.

I would not be surprised if the kids at Monster House were the first human ones to whom he was a friendly figure rather than a scary monster. (But really, I know ~nothing about his existance before moving in with the narrator, so that may be way off-base.) Being a bit of a marshmallow about a kid who needs you is ... well, it's pretty reasonable for a human. (Where do bogeymen come from?)

It's kind of a spectrum

Aye, but what does that curve look like?
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: January 7th, 2012 07:12 am (UTC) (Link)

O_O

>>Where do bogeymen come from?<<

He said: "I was born human. My mother threw me in a dustbin right after I was born. I was found and nursed by a night mare, and this is what I became."

Well. I had no idea. There could be different origins for other bogeymen, or it could be consistent, or even some of each. Monsters do run to variety, though.
kelkyag From: kelkyag Date: January 7th, 2012 10:25 am (UTC) (Link)

O_o

Is that ... what his foster-mother expected or intended?

If the bogeyman has more to say about his life before he met the narrator, I would be most curious.

Does he have/use/want a name? None of the characters in the main family of the series are mentioned by name that I can think of, where various others are. (I suspect reference by relationship is easier for new readers.) I've been assuming that the humans have mundane names, and I imagine the little old lady ghost does, though the family might not know it, but I've no idea about the nonhumans.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: January 7th, 2012 11:36 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: O_o

>>Is that ... what his foster-mother expected or intended?<<

I don't know for sure. It seems that contact with the mystical expands a person's opportunities. I doubt that there is a predetermined path, but there are likely to be strong possibilities. Major events change people, and close contact with the mystical can make those changes more dramatic. So it was likely that he would change and no longer be ordinary. The form it took for him was probably a combination of his foster-mother's influence, his personal experience, and his innate personality.

>>If the bogeyman has more to say about his life before he met the narrator, I would be most curious.<<

Me too. Maybe it will pop up in some fishbowl, or elsewhen.

>>Does he have/use/want a name?<<

Not that I know of so far. For some reason, many of the characters in this series just don't seem to use names much. I think it gives them kind of an 'everyone' vibe. It's interesting because characters are usually forthcoming with their names when I write about them; it's often the first thing I get. When they don't, and it's in a cluster like this, I tend to respect that.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: January 7th, 2012 07:19 am (UTC) (Link)

Thoughts

>>I would not be surprised if the kids at Monster House were the first human ones to whom he was a friendly figure rather than a scary monster.<<

It could be. Then again, he might have had another household prior to finding the narrator.

>> (But really, I know ~nothing about his existance before moving in with the narrator, so that may be way off-base.) <<

He hasn't been greatly talkative with me either, thus far.

>>Being a bit of a marshmallow about a kid who needs you is ... well, it's pretty reasonable for a human. <<

True.

*ponder* Looking at the poems so far, the monsters mostly seem pretty contextual: they are gentle and friendly with people they know, either gentle or invisible to people who are decent or haven't bothered them, but can be anywhere from pesky to vicious with people who annoy or threaten them.

>>Aye, but what does that curve look like?<<

I suspect a bell curve, though possibly a squashed one here or there. The "will not see" end may be higher than a regular bell end, for instance.
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