January 13th, 2009

neutral

Building Windmills

Don't let lack of support or ideal materials stop you from doing what needs to be done.

For the Love of a Windmill

Sometimes it takes one person’s undying focus and energy to make a change. In this case William Kamkwamba was just such a man, or 14-year old boy, as the case was. Living in a small town in Malawi with no electricity, William was determined to power his family’s home with used parts and ingenuity…and a little education.

“An organization called the Malawian Teacher Training Activity contributed a large quantity of books to the primary school library near my home,” William said. “One of the books was called Using Energy. Inside there were plans for a windmill so I decided to build one to provide power for my family.”

neutral

Poll: Upcoming Poetry Fishbowl Themes

Yesterday's post generated a number of interesting suggestions for fishbowl topics, some of which were so closely related that I decided to merge them. Here is a poll to determine which of these have the most audience appeal. Donors, you may vote for TWO themes. Everybody else may vote for ONE theme.

Poll #1330491 Upcoming Themes for Poetry Fishbowls

Which of the following topics would you most like to see in a Poetry Fishbowl?

Exploration & travel
3(13.6%)
Lost/hidden/microscopic things
6(27.3%)
Random word sets
0(0.0%)
Romance & science and love
3(13.6%)
neutral

Change This

Change This is a site that specializes in social dynamics. They believe that people can make good decisions if given good information and necessary skills. So they call for proposals of "manifestos" and have people vote on them. The most popular ones get published and distributed as PDF books. You can read the proposals here. A very promising manifesto by one of my writer-friends, Kelley Eskridge, is currently seeking votes; if you've ever had a bad manager or a boss from hell, clicky-clicky.
neutral

Change This

Change This is a site that specializes in social dynamics. They believe that people can make good decisions if given good information and necessary skills. So they call for proposals of "manifestos" and have people vote on them. The most popular ones get published and distributed as PDF books. You can read the proposals here. A very promising manifesto by one of my writer-friends, Kelley Eskridge, is currently seeking votes; if you've ever had a bad manager or a boss from hell, clicky-clicky. It's not exactly like cyberfunded creativity, but it's very close.