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Prejudices in Film - The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Prejudices in Film
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paka From: paka Date: November 17th, 2011 10:44 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

The other thing I hate, as long as we're on the topic and I'm at risk of sounding like a backwards jerk, is that to some extent I think ethnicity and gender winds up being sort of a default. I think it's a more conscious choice in movies and TV.

But with things like art for roleplaying games and comic books (which I love), it always feels like there's this assumption. "Oh! Hey! When I look in the mirror, I see a white guy! My friends are white guys. Most of the people buying this stuff will be white guys. Therefore the protagonists are white and male, except oh, I guess we need a girl in the team." It's just not very realistic to me; it's like if you drew stuff where gravity wasn't working. Heck, I'd be more willing to buy into all the protagonists being a small group of white guys, 'cause I've seen that before. Invariably the fallout seems to be "oh, well, there's a girl on the team. What do girls do? I guess stand around and look hot."

(I know there've been some seriously talented Filipinos in comics. I wonder what they think of how every character they draw is white, with a few Black guys and now and then an Asian shows up, always as some form of martial artist, and always from Japan or China.)
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: November 17th, 2011 11:17 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

>> But with things like art for roleplaying games and comic books (which I love), it always feels like there's this assumption. <<

I enjoy gaming (as a player) to get AWAY from being myself. I tend to choose characters very different from my everyday form and personality. The last three were a centaur stallion, bay with tanned skin; a Vistani, light brown skin and black hair; and a winged half-celestial, fair-colored (all male, I tend to play males). Most of my gamers (when I'm running a game) like the chance to swap some major characteristic such as species, sex, coloring, etc. I tend toward the far end of the bell curve, though. *snicker* I have to wonder if this contributes to my ability to accomplish the impossible in games.

>>I know there've been some seriously talented Filipinos in comics. I wonder what they think of how every character they draw is white, with a few Black guys and now and then an Asian shows up, always as some form of martial artist, and always from Japan or China.<<

Some resent it, based on articles I've seen complaining about the lack of diversity. It comes up with webcomics sometimes, where people have a lot more flexibility and diversity.

*ponder* Let's see, my Morgan (Hawai'ian/Japanese/American) doesn't seem to know martial arts and isn't particularly athletic; she's an astronomer, though she's skilled at swimming and canoeing. I don't think the paper mages are martial artists either; they solve their problems with magic or philosophy. Huh ... I probably have a martial artist around somewhere in my fictional characters, but can't think of one off the top of my head. Kay, maybe, since she's military; but she's Hispanic.

This also reminds me that anime and manga run heavily to white characters too. That bugs me. A majority of that stuff is created by Japanese people; I'd rather see Japanese characters in there. It makes me happy when I find examples that really draw on Japanese culture and charaters; Spirited Away is a favorite.
paka From: paka Date: November 18th, 2011 06:48 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

I'm led to understand that manga/anime characters are really very much influenced by the late Osamu Tezuka, who was going off of Disney ideas (so minimizing dead areas on faces). I'd assumed that the default manga characters were supposed to be basically Japanese - just so completely stylized that they weren't particularly any one group.

One of the weirder manga that way is Shirow's Appleseed series; he does the thing you read about in Scott McCloud, where the most accessible characters are intentionally made most non-descript, and more distanced characters have more specific facial features. So Deunan and Briareous are, I believe, supposed to be Americans originally (and Shirow's canon is that Briareous was dark-skinned, back before he was converted to being a cyborg!), they'll be interacting with characters who are pretty specifically white, or Asian or Black, and then they'll go hang out with Hitomi and her nice boyfriend, who are pretty obviously supposed to be Japanese and yet they have manga-generic features. It's kinda bizarre that way.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: November 18th, 2011 05:52 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thoughts

>> I'd assumed that the default manga characters were supposed to be basically Japanese - just so completely stylized that they weren't particularly any one group. <<

Not very often. First, look at the eyes. These characters tend to have huge round eyes with level set, whereas Asian people usually have almond-shaped eyes often with a tilt. Also worth considering is coloration. Bright, inhuman colors of hair and eyes are common, whereas Asian people tend to have black or brown hair and dark eyes. Skin color is often fair, lacking the various golden tones of Asian skin. These are not universal in anime and manga, but they're quite widespread -- most of the creators seem to favor characters who don't look like themselves. They're free to do that, of course, but it creeps me out a bit and makes me favor the ones who at least sometimes draw characters that could plausibly be considered as stylized Japanese (or whatever, some are set in China etc.).

I really liked Disney's Mulan in part because the characters were expressive, not caricatured, and recognizably Chinese.

>>One of the weirder manga that way is Shirow's Appleseed series; he does the thing you read about in Scott McCloud, where the most accessible characters are intentionally made most non-descript, and more distanced characters have more specific facial features.<<

Huh, fascinating!

Often I'll mix up the races in my writing, just because I like diversity and want to represent a bunch of different people. If race matters, I'll specify it. Other times, though, I'll leave it open to interpretation so people can imagine a character who is like themselves if they wish. *ponder* Which makes me wonder, given the social tendency to assume white as the default, if ethnic folks assume a character resembles them only when that is explicitly stated.
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