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Major Update to Serial Poetry Page - The Wordsmith's Forge — LiveJournal
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Major Update to Serial Poetry Page

I've made a major update to the "Serial Poetry" page on my PenUltimate Productions website   There are FOUR new sections, wow!  This is the most new series launched in a fishbowl yet.

"Gloryroad Crossing" is about a little hamlet where adventurers come between adventures.  So far there are poems about the barkeeper and the baker who live there.

"The Ocracies" is a setting designed to explore other governments than monarchies in fantasy.  It begins with the Plutocracy of Aurea, seen from the perspective of two different citizens.

"Path of the Paladins" begins with a ruined village and a world-weary hera.  Shahana the Paladin soon picks up a traveling companion.  The second poem in this series shows someone else's perspective.

"Sort of Heroes" introduces Nib and Brod, ex-henchmen of an evil overlord, and the sword that's going to teach them how to be heroes.  The first poem posted was actually written quite some time ago, and just sponsored.  The second poem introduces a friend of theirs; it's reprinted from a fantasy magazine.  The third one was written during the July fishbowl, making this a series, and hasn't been sponsored yet but is listed.

The new Fiorenza poem is also listed, "From the Free City."  It will become available after "Fiorenza and the Witch-Son" is fully funded and posted.
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ankewehner From: ankewehner Date: July 9th, 2011 05:37 am (UTC) (Link)
What's a hera?
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: July 9th, 2011 06:59 am (UTC) (Link)

Okay...

A hera is a female protagonist, the same as a hero is a male protagonist. This is the character with maximum agency in a story, the most power to act and have an impact. A heroine is a hero's female love-interest. I have occasionally used "heronet" to denote a hera's male love-interest. They have less agency, usually orient on the protagonist, and tend to be more responsive than proactive.
ankewehner From: ankewehner Date: July 9th, 2011 08:03 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Okay...

Ah. I thought "hera" was ment to evoke some connection with or connotation of the goddess Hera.

I've never come across the idea that a heroine is a love interest (beyond the more universal "female characters are always love intersts"), and didn't think that any male protagonist was automatically a hero.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: July 9th, 2011 08:19 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Okay...

>>Ah. I thought "hera" was ment to evoke some connection with or connotation of the goddess Hera.<<

I believe the term "hera" is polygenetic. One approach is indeed to take it from the goddess name. The other is to replace the masculine -o with feminine -a, hero > hera.

>>I've never come across the idea that a heroine is a love interest (beyond the more universal "female characters are always love intersts"), and didn't think that any male protagonist was automatically a hero.<<

In various places, I've seen heroine defined as love-interest. There are other definitions too. But I don't like heroine for a female lead, because -ine is a diminutive ending.
ankewehner From: ankewehner Date: July 9th, 2011 08:23 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Okay...

That makes sense.
5 comments or Leave a comment