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The Wordsmith's Forge
The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette
ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith
Poem: "wings of paper, wings of lace"
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aldersprig From: aldersprig Date: March 4th, 2011 01:00 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thank you!

You do it well. Even when I can notice that you are writing a point I don't agree with, I never feel preached at, and I can enjoy the piece without getting caught up in, or made uncomfortable by, the message.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 4th, 2011 01:06 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thank you!

>>You do it well. Even when I can notice that you are writing a point I don't agree with, I never feel preached at, and I can enjoy the piece without getting caught up in, or made uncomfortable by, the message.<<

Oh, that is good to hear! It's one of the things I can't really tell for myself.

Sometimes I like to stretch by writing perspectives I don't necessarily share. "Peaches from the Tree of Heaven" is basically a pro-life story. The Origami Mage series features a protagonist who prevails by being humble and nonaggressive, qualities that I can admire but ... well, she does things very differently than I do.
aldersprig From: aldersprig Date: March 4th, 2011 01:42 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thank you!

*nodS*

That's something I'm still working on, myself. Sometimes I'm surprised to hear how or where my politics leak in a story.
ysabetwordsmith From: ysabetwordsmith Date: March 4th, 2011 01:59 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Thank you!

Even I don't always spot everything, though I try. Sometimes I am surprised by what people can read between the lines. I once had someone figure out Persian as one of the influences behind something I'd written -- and it was from Penumbra, which means the description was nearly nil.

It helps to read and explore widely. The more different worldviews you've seen, the easier it becomes to step outside your own so that you can see the shape of it more clearly. Then you know where its shadow falls while you are writing.
37 comments or Leave a comment